Exporting Your Logos 4 Library to Zotero

About a year-and-a-half ago, I wrote a blog post that showed you how to export your Libronix library to the popular bibliography and citation manager Zotero. Since Logos 4 has launched, I’ve received multiple emails asking me if I’d explain how the process works with Logos 4.

Here are the five simple steps you’ll need to take.

Step 1: Change your citation style to BibTeX.

Go to Tools > Program Settings, look for Citation Style under the General settings, and select BibTeX Style from the dropdown. Or just type Set Citation Style to BibTeX in the Command Bar. (You can also use either the RIS or Refer/BibIX style.)

Step 2: Create a collection of all your resources.

Go to Tools > Collections and click New. Give it a name like All, and then enter rating:>=0 into the “Start with resources matching” box. This will find all resources with a rating of 0 or higher, which is equivalent to all resources. If you don’t want to export all of your resources, create a collection of just the ones you want.

Step 3: Export your collection to a text file.

With that collection opened, click on the panel menu and choose “Export to bibliography.” Give your file a name like Zotero, and save it to your desktop as a .txt file.

Step 4: Change your citation style back to your preferred style.

Once you’ve successfully exported your library or collection, you can change your citation style back to what it was before. You can do it through the Settings panel or via the Command Bar.

Step 5: Import your file into Zotero.

In Zotero, click on the Actions button and choose Import. Select your Zotero.txt file and click Open. Depending on how many resources you’re importing, it may take anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes.

Once importing is complete, you’re ready to go. You can now use Logos 4 for your researching and allow Zotero to manage your citations and bibliographies.

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16 Responses to “Exporting Your Logos 4 Library to Zotero”

  1. Ken Shawver June 16, 2010 at 5:38 pm #

    Nice item Phil, too bad it doesn’t support Internet Explorer. I don’t want to load some other browser just use this feature, they should expand their support.

  2. Phil Gons June 16, 2010 at 6:53 pm #

    That is definitely one limitation of it, but perhaps think of it as a standalone piece of software. In that case, it wouldn’t work in IE and would require a separate app to be running. For more on this, see http://www.zotero.org/support/kb/browser_compatibility.

  3. Dan June 16, 2010 at 7:10 pm #

    It would be great to be able to do this for EndNote as well – perhaps it’s already possible, and we just need a blog post to remind us how? *nudge* *nudge*

  4. Byung-Kyu Kim June 16, 2010 at 10:39 pm #

    Great news for research! Thanks a lot.

  5. CJ Ransdell June 17, 2010 at 6:13 am #

    Thanks for this post. For those of you who use endnote I did the same things as above, except that I set the citation to the Refer/BiblX style. Saved it as a text file, and imported it right into endnote.

  6. Peter Tremblay June 17, 2010 at 7:25 am #

    This procedure did not work for me unless I set “rating:.-0″. Why? If I set “rating:>0″ I had only 2 resources. I also noticed that all but these two resources had no rating at all. Why?

  7. Phil Gons June 17, 2010 at 8:48 am #

    What you need to use is rating:>=0. You’re missing the equals sign.
    The reason only two resources have ratings is that you haven’t rated the others yet. These are your ratings of your resources. They are all unrated until you rate them.

  8. Shawn Redford June 17, 2010 at 2:39 pm #

    Using CJ Ransdell’s suggestion, I exported from Logos using the Refer/BiblX style and then in EndnoteX, I used File->Import with the Refer/BiblX style selected for the Import Option field. However, the result had numerous “%7 electronic ed.” added to the end of the “Publisher” or “Volume” field in EndnoteX. What was happening is that EndnoteX was not recognizing %7 as the “Edition” field and so it was just adding the info to the end of the field. So I made the following changes to get it to import correctly.
    Within EndNote X3:
    (1) Edit->Import Filters->Open Filter Manager (“EndNote Import Filters” window appears)
    (2) Scroll down to ReferBibIX and press Edit (“ReferBibIX” window appears)
    (3) Now click on Templates and select “Book” under Reference Types field at the top
    (4) Change the last line as follows: %Y to %7 and in the adjacent field “Notes” to “Edition”
    (5) Change the second line as follows: Leave %B as is, and change the adjacent field from “Notes” to “Series Title” — you can use the Insert Field button to save on typing.
    (6) Close and save as “ReferBibIX-Logos”
    When you import the Bibliography text file that you saved from Logos, choose “ReferBibIX-Logos” in the Import Option field. If you notice any other fields that are not properly imported, please post it here.
    Given the two field changes above, I think that all of the data transferred. The series title is really important to see commentary sets. Journals, such as _Evangelical Review of Theology_ and _Biblical Archaeologist_ are exported as books by Logos, but since these are not a journal *articles*, and Endnote does not have a field for an entire journal, it is not a big deal.
    The only other strange thing is that exactly 30 of my resources did not come into EndnoteX. I don’t know why this is. I looked through the exported text file from Logos and everything was listed as a book, so I don’t know what the problem is. I have too many resources to figure this out by a process of elimination. The only thing I can think of is that some of my oldest resources may not have associated bibliographical data.
    Unrelated to the above, I’m curious if anyone knows of a standard approach for citing Logos books (CMOS or otherwise). “Electronic ed.” is just too vague at this point IMHO – it is no different than stating “physical book” which doesn’t help much. My thinking is that “Logos electronic ed.” would be the best way to cite Logos resources to differentiate them from PDFs, Kindle Books and the many others that exist. What do you think?

  9. Scott Aniol June 18, 2010 at 1:58 pm #

    Hey, Phil. Do you still use LibraryThing? Can you do the same thing to import your Logos library into there?

  10. Phil Gons June 18, 2010 at 2:03 pm #

    I have an account, but haven’t done much with it in a while.
    I’m not sure. LT uses ISBNs for importing, but may support other input methods. I haven’t explored this.

  11. Bob Gaston June 19, 2010 at 5:01 am #

    What’s the advantage of “Zotero”. I am a little behind in understanding this. Sincerely Bob

  12. Shawn Redford June 19, 2010 at 2:18 pm #

    For those of you who want more details on converting to EndnoteX format, take a look at this post:
    http://community.logos.com/forums/t/18577.aspx

  13. Phil Gons June 19, 2010 at 8:38 pm #

    It’s primarily for people who write lots of papers, articles, books, etc. and need robust citation and bibliography management. It automatically uses shortened citations and ibids where appropriate. It also allows you to manage all of your sources in a single place (Logos books, print books, PDFs, online sources, etc.).

  14. Duncan Johnson July 9, 2010 at 7:04 am #

    LibraryThing doesn’t claim to support BibTex imports, but if the BibTex file includes the ISBN it may work.
    Alternatively, if you can export some way that can be manipulated into CSV, LibraryThing will take that.
    http://www.librarything.com/wiki/index.php/Adding_and_importing_books#How_does_the_Universal_Import_work.3F

  15. Bill Gordon September 24, 2011 at 1:19 pm #

    This suggestion for downloading my Logos books to Zotero was great! My text file was over 700 pages, but it imported without any problems. The best thing about Zotero is it is free. I will start recommending it to my students.

  16. Don October 24, 2012 at 12:54 pm #

    I followed this directions but imported the file into Sente Reference Manager. The file imported flawlessly and all my resources were added.

    But, it isn’t the complete solution I’m looking for to write papers, theses, and dissertation. For example, it doesn’t include series and other pertinent information for accurate bibliographic citations.

    It would be especially helpful to have the ISBN numbers since this would allow me to identify the correct edition and the corresponding graphic image file. Still, it will cite. However, I will still have to identify which records need to be updated with date, e.g. “signed article in a collected work with editor as author,” “editor,” “two authors,” “book with named author of the foreword,” etc. Not fun, still lots of work.