Archive - May, 2010

Logos 4: Phrase Searching

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Years ago I owned a print book called The Phrase Concordance of the Bible which contained the locations of numerous phrases in the Bible. I really liked this book, but quite often was frustrated with it. Inevitably the phrase I wanted to lookup was not in the book. Obviously there’s no practical way to make an exhaustive concordance of every phrase in the Bible. Logos 4 allows us, however, to locate any phrase in any Bible, regardless of how obscure the phrase may be. Here’s one way to access your exhaustive phrase concordance:

  • Open any Bible to any passage
  • Select (highlight) any phrase
  • Right click on the selection
  • Update: From the right side of the pop-up menu click Selection your phrase
    • Example: Selection praise the Lord.
    • Reference, Greek Strong’s or another item may already be selected so be sure to click Selection.
  • Update: Then, from the left side of the menu click Search this resource

Your results appear almost instantly!

Please note this potential problem: If you select a phrase containing a footnote, the search will yield no hits.

Here’s one way to avoid the problem:

  • On the Bible click the Visual filters icon (three circles icon)
  • Select Bible text only

Now the Bible is displayed in list form with no footnotes or cross references. Phrase searching is now much easier.

Enjoy locating praise the Lord, and grace to you, and will of God, and

Remembering Athanasius

athanasius.pngYesterday, May 2, marked the death of one of the great Church Fathers, Athanasius, in 373. For those who aren’t familiar with the Church Fathers, I pulled this excerpt from The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church regarding Athanasius’ importance in the history of the Church. If you’d like to read Athanasius’ work, as well as many of the early Church Fathers, be sure to check out Early Church Fathers Protestant Edition (37 Vols.).

His (Athanasius) most famous work is the De Incarnatione, the second of two closely linked treatises. In it he expounds how God the Word (Logos), by His union with manhood, restored to fallen man the image of God in which he had been created (Gen. 1:27), and by His death and resurrection met and overcame death, the consequence of sin. Many scholars date the work before c.318, when Athanasius was still in his twenties, but others place it 15–20 years later. As bishop he was the greatest and most consistent theological opponent of Arianism. From 339 to 359 he wrote a series of works in defence of the faith proclaimed at Nicaea—that is, the true deity of God the Son. From about 361 onwards he especially sought the reconciliation of the large Semiarian party to the Nicene term homoousios (‘of one substance’), which they were reluctant to accept. The Council of Alexandria (362), under his direction, greatly furthered this end, by clearing up misunderstandings of the terms ὑπόστασις (translated ‘person’) and οὐσία (‘substance’). He also argued for the deity of the Holy Spirit in his Epistles to Serapion.
F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, 3rd ed. rev. (Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 121.

You can also learn more about Athanasius in John Piper’s, Contending for Our All.
Image taken from Nelson’s New Christian Dictionary

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