Archive - March, 2010

Logos 4: Cross Reference Lookup Bible

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

When I studied with print books I had an old, well-used Bible on my desk. This Bible’s sole purpose was to look up Bible cross references. Because it was “broken in,” I could quickly turn the pages to a desired location. My new Bible always stayed open to the passage I was studying and then it would go to the pulpit with me. With Logos 4 you can designate a “cross reference look-up” Bible while staying in the same location in another Bible. Here’s how it works:

Scattered throughout your Logos resources are hyperlinked Bible cross references. Normally when you click a link your Preferred Bible will look up the passage. You can override that default by designating a “target Bible.”

  • Click the panel menu in your secondary Bible. It can be another copy of your Preferred Bible or a completely different Bible.
  • From the panel menu select Send hyperlinks here. Notice a target image appears on the panel menu.

Now when you click a Bible cross reference in any resource, this Bible will jump to that location!

Which Commentary is Best?

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

I get asked this question a lot, a people seems somewhat disappointed by my response of “It depends on what you’re doing.” It’s like being asked what the best tool is in my garage: the answer will always be “the tool best suited to my task,” depending on what I’m doing. Here’s what I mean.

When tackling a tough passage I’ll typically consult scholarly commentaries like the Anchor-Yale Bible or International Critical Commentary volumes, and even from the forthcoming Continental Commentary Series among others. I can guess your first question: “Why in the world would I want to read Claus Westermann on Genesis or Hans-Joachim Kraus on the Psalms, aren’t these guys pioneers in source and form criticism?” Why yes, as a matter of fact they are. But they also knew their Hebrew better than most folks alive today, and they have spent most of their lives studying these books in far greater detail than I ever will. I may not share their presuppositions about Scripture, but there is much to commend their exegesis.

One of the biggest hurdles I had to overcome in seminary was being willing to learn from someone with whom I disagreed with on certain issues. I learned to read past differences in order to learn from their expertise. In a previous post I mentioned the value of older commentaries, noting that many times you will find a more robust engagement of the text on works by Godet, Olshausen and Alford, who were not distracted by the modern issues that can preoccupy new commentators. But this is not to say there is never a time to interact with critical scholars. Like any tool, each one has its strengths and weaknesses, each contributes something to the process.

Before you get the wrong impression, you need to know that I also make regular use of more devotional commentaries. The Focus on the Bible Commentaries and Christian Focus Biblical Studies Collection are great examples. Getting the difficult exegetical questions answered is not all there is to studying a passage, you also need to be able to clearly and relevantly communicate what you have learned. If you like the academic side of things like me, you too may struggle with seeing the bigger picture of a passage: the theme, flow or theology of a passage or book. I can have all the greatest information in the world, but it is useless to the congregation if I cannot present it in a way that they can understand.

Most often the more technical issues never get mentioned in the sermon, but are more about me feeling like I have handled them. Less-academically oriented commentaries—yes, even the warm fuzzy ones—are a great safeguard against missing the “forest” because of looking too closely at a piece of bark on a single “tree”. I read devotional commentaries just a critically as I do the scholarly ones, sifting wheat from chaff.

So which commentaries are best? The ones that you need for what you are working on. Just like I use my hand saw for some applications and an axe for another, building a diverse collection of commentaries can be a great boon to your study. The academically-oriented volumes can address specific questions, whereas the “lighter” ones can provide great ideas for how best to present what you have found.

For a helpful guide to multi-volume commentaries available for Logos, see our Commentary Product Guide.

Taking Advantage of Video Tutorials

Video Tutorial

We are amassing quite a collection of feature and tutorial videos for Logos 4. At present, there are over 80 videos covering a variety of topics aimed at helping you get the most out of your Logos 4 experience. If you are looking for some help understanding things like Passage Guides, Layout Management, or Customizable Guides these video tutorials provide a wellspring of information. Would you believe there are six videos alone aimed at helping you use the Notes feature to the fullest!?

We would love to see all Logos 4 users seeing these videos as a valuable tool in their Logos 4 arsenal. Each video is—on average—a four minute investment into using your Logos 4 software to its fullest. An investment which is promised to pay huge dividends in your devotions and study time. In fact, we are so convinced of this that we intend to feature these videos here on the blog site on a semi-regular basis. Stay on the look out for more featured tutorials.

Before You Install Logos 4

If you are considering an upgrade—or a first time purchase of any Logos 4 Base Package—then you are going to want to take a couple of minutes and watch this video. It will walk you through installation, setup, your Logos.com account, resource downloads, and indexing. This video is a great tool to help kick off your Logos 4 experience.

Who Is John Henry Newman, and Why Is He Important?

John Henry Newman

Today’s guest post is written by Louis St. Hilaire, the Catholic Product Manager at Logos Bible Software.

From his evangelical youth to his leadership of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement to his embrace of Roman Catholicism, the career and legacy of John Henry Newman is marked by brilliance and controversy.

His engagement with liberal, evangelical and catholic movements within the Church of England in his time makes him a pivotal figure, important for understanding the Anglican Communion today. Evangelical and Calvinist influences dominated his upbringing and adolescent religious awakening, but his studies of the Early Church led him to advocate—with the other leaders of the Oxford Movement—a return to the theological, ecclesiological and liturgical traditions of the first millennium as a necessary bulwark against liberalism. Many date the end of the Oxford Movement to Newman’s break with the Anglo-Catholics and reception into the Roman Catholic Church, but the work of the Movement remained influential and the conflicts of the nineteenth century are still visible in the High, Low and Broad Church tendencies within the Anglican Communion today.

Though his years as a Catholic were at times overshadowed by conflict and suspicion of his ideas from the hierarchy, he has become a favorite of modern popes, who, according Newman biographer Fr. Ian Ker, “look to him as a man who welcomed modernisation but in fidelity to Church authority and in continuity with the traditions of the Church”. It is widely expected that he will be beatified—the second to last step in being recognized as a saint—by Pope Benedict XVI in September of this year.

Claimed both by liberal Catholics for his insights into the nature of conscience and the development of doctrine, and claimed by conservative Catholics for his vigorous opposition to the liberal Christianity of his day, Newman is widely recognized as a forerunner of the Second Vatican Council and a profound influence on the direction of the modern Catholic Church.

We have put together a 31-volume collection titles written by Newman, available on Pre-Pub in the Collected Works of John Henry Newman (31 Vols.). This collection contains essays, lectures and sermons, spanning his Anglican and Catholic periods, dealing with history, theology, logic, apologetics and education. Right now, they’re on Pre-Pub for a steep discount. Head on over to the product page to learn more.

Here are some highlights from the collection:

  • An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine is Newman’s innovative and historically sensitive defense of Roman Catholic tradition. Written out of his own struggles between his abandonment of Anglicanism and reception into the Catholic Church, the Essay carves out a paradoxically modern traditionalism.
  • An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent is a philosophical defense of the assent of faith, a masterpiece of Christian personalism, illuminating the interior experience of reason and belief.
  • Apologia Pro Vita Sua is Newman’s defense of the development of his own thought against the accusations of Charles Kingsley. It has become a classic in the tradition of Christian autobiography begun by St. Augustine’s Confessions.
  • The Lectures on Justification, written in his Anglican period, carve out a via media on the question of justification, anticipating the rapprochement between Catholic and Protestant positions seen in the ecumenical dialogue of the 20th century.
  • Parochial and Plain Sermons is an 8-volume collection of sermons Newman delivered as an Anglican vicar at Oxford. Inspired by his study of the Church Fathers, they were deeply influential at Oxford and throughout England.

Head on over to the John Henry Newman page to learn more and check out the complete list of titles! You can also peruse the Catholic Product Guide for a wealth of resources written by Catholic authors on matters of doctrine, history, ecclesiology, and Christian spirituality.

Custom-Built Bookcase for Sale, Low Miles

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

This would be the heading of my want ad if I were to post one. You see, ten years ago when we bought our house, one of the first personal projects I did was build a custom, floor-to-ceiling bookcase in my new office.

At the time I was regularly buying Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplemental volumes, scholarly commentaries like Word Biblical Commentary, ICC, and the Anchor Bible and whatever else I needed to write my MTS thesis. This bookcase was to be the showpiece of my scholarly man-cave. I even inherited a great leather chair from an aunt-in-law, the kind that was scratched by a cat and isn’t allowed in the living room any more. Life was great—until something happened.

Continue Reading…

Logos 4: Calculate Distances on a Map

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As you’re reading in the Scriptures do you ever wonder how far people walked from city to city? If so, you can easily answer that question in Logos 4 with a tool called Biblical Places.

  • Choose Tools | Biblical Places
  • Type Corinth in the Place box
  • Click the Search arrow or press the Enter key to generate the report
  • The first map to appear will probably be entitled Paul’s Trip to Rome (if not, select the first thumbnail from the list at the bottom)

To calculate distances between places on the map:

  • Position your mouse pointerat a location on the map
  • Hold down the Ctrl key
  • Move the mouse to another location and the distance between the two places appears on the screen

Pretty cool! Enjoy!

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