How to Celebrate John Calvin’s 501st Birthday

Calvin 500 Collection (108 Vols.)

John Calvin is one of the church’s greatest theologians, and Calvinism one of the Western world’s most influential intellectual movements. Calvin was a theologian, pastor, biblical exegete, and tireless apologist for Reformed Christianity. His theological works, biblical commentaries, tracts, treatises, and letters helped establish the Reformation as a legitimate and thriving religious movement throughout Europe and the world.

No theologian has been acclaimed or assailed as much as Calvin. Calvinism has spawned movements and sparked controversy throughout the centuries. Wars have been fought both to defend and destroy it, and its later proponents began political and theological revolutions in Western Europe and America. The breadth and depth of the engagement with Calvin’s works since they first appeared four centuries ago—and their continuous publication since then—testifies to Calvin’s importance and lasting value for the church today. Thinking Christians from the twenty-first century who ignore Calvin’s writings do so at their own peril.

To celebrate Calvin’s birthday and his importance for the church today, we launched the Calvin 500 Collection—a massive project to convert 108 books by or about Calvin to our format. The Calvin 500 Collection includes:

  • 3 English translations of Calvin’s Institutes—including the rare Thomas Norton translation
  • Latin and French editions of Calvin’s Institutes
  • Complete set of Calvin’s commentaries
  • Four volumes of Calvin’s letters and correspondence
  • Dozens of tracts and theological treatises written by Calvin
  • Ten biographies of Calvin’s life and work
  • 31 volumes of secondary literature on the history and influence of Calvinism

We hoped to complete the project during 2009 (before Calvin turned 501), but it didn’t happen. Some of the texts, like the Norton translation of the Institutes—the first in the English language—took longer than we planned. We also ran into some problems with the commentaries which needed some special attention.

But the biggest delay happened when we launched Logos 4 in November. In the weeks before the launch, all efforts were devoted to making sure it happened as smoothly as possible—finishing all new books for the expanded Logos 4 base packages, working with our beta testers, building the new Logos iPhone app, training our customer service department and sales teams, and hundreds (thousands?) of other behind-the-scenes projects.

We’ve been busy since the release, too. We’ve been reading the emails you’ve sent us, talking to you on the phone, closely watching the Community Forums, listening to customer feedback, creating training videos and support pages, and doing everything we can to make Logos 4 even better. Since the launch, we’ve released a major update to Logos 4, with tons of new features. We’ve been updating the Mac version just about every week. And we just came out with a brand new update to the Logos iPhone app which now allows offline reading on your iPod Touch or on the iPhone when you’re in an airplane. Oh, and did we mention there are 1,000 more books available for reading on your iPhone than there were a month ago? These are just a handful of great reasons to upgrade today—and until the end of next week, you can still get 25% off when you upgrade to Logos 4.

So you can see why the Calvin 500 Collection wasn’t finished by the end of 2009.

Fortunately, even though it’s 2010 now, John Calvin is still 500 years old. He doesn’t turn 501 years old until July 10, 2010, and by then, you’ll be using Logos Bible Software to read all of Calvin’s commentaries, books, and theological works.

In fact, you’ll be reading the new Calvin books much sooner than July. We are very, very close to finishing the project. Although we are not quite ready to project a ship date, we can promise that it will be soon.

One last thing, the Pre-Pub price for the Calvin 500 Collection will go up on Friday, which means you still have four more days to lock your order in the current price. If you’re thinking of pre-ordering, do it now before the price goes up.

Logos 4: Close All

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As you study the Bible with Logos Bible Software 4, you’ll find yourself with numerous resources, tools, and guides open on the screen. Now it’s time to close the panels and move in a different direction. You can of course close each panel individually, but that may take a while. So here’s a quick way to close everything on the screen and return to the Home Page.

Type close all in the Command Bar and press the Enter key.

For more commands to use in the Command Bar, read the Command Bar training article and watch the tutorial video.

Logos 4: Introductory discounts end January 31st!

Growing up in a household of seven—five kids, and my parents—I didn’t always get what I wanted, but I found that if there was something I believed I “absolutely needed” (in my adolescent opinion), I did what it took to get it.

In high school, a few friends and I were really into bodyboarding, the sport commonly known as “boogie boarding.” While at my favorite local surf shop one day, I found the board I had to have. This board was the Logos Bible Software 4 of bodyboards. I was able to set the board on layaway with a down payment, so I knew it would eventually be mine. From there on out, every dime I got went toward that board. I stashed away my lunch money, money from chores, and change from the couch—I was on a mission.

Eventually the day came when I had enough saved up. I was so stoked to be riding waves on my new board. It was well worth the wait, well worth not blowing my money on smaller things (who needs to each lunch anyway?) so I could have a really cool, brand new bodyboard. I still operate with the same mindset all these years later—just ask my wife. My point is, if I have to choose between buying smaller things I’m sure I would enjoy, or saving up for a more rewarding, cooler purchase, I will almost always save my money for the more rewarding purchase. I see it as an investment. I see it as going without until I can afford what I really want.

Whether you find yourself agreeing with my purchasing mentality or not, I would approach owning a Logos 4 base package the same way I did while trying to purchase my bodyboard. I would do what it takes. And better than layaway from my high school days, Logos has payment plans which allow you to start using your software right away, while spreading out your payments over several months.

There are many reasons why you should upgrade or purchase a new Logos 4 base package.
Previous posts like The Best Reason to Upgrade, Upgrade Illustrated, How to Get the Most Out of the Logos iPhone App, and 4 Ways to Move to Logos 4 have already given detailed reasons.

So here’s one straightforward reason: Introductory discounts end January 31st.

Come February 1st, we hope no one will say, “I didn’t know. Why didn’t you tell me?”
We also hope your friends and family will not discover you to be a Logos user who never told them how Logos Bible Software 4 could transform their Bible study—and that if they had bought before February, they could have saved 25% on their base package. I can’t say it more emphatically. If you can, do what it takes to get Logos Bible Software 4 before the end of the month.

One More Chance to Win

Last June, Dan walked into my office and said, “I want to do a Bible giveaway… a huge Bible giveaway.” We talked through the details, called some of our publisher friends, and a few weeks later launched a six month promotion in which we gave away 78 ultra-premium Bibles, worth over $12,000.
The response to the promotion was overwhelming, with thousands of people participating. One of the highlights for me was contacting the winners every month. Numerous times I got to hear stories of people who were so very blessed by the promotion. One email I received was from a preacher who had won the NASB Large Print Bible. He wrote, “This Bible will go to good use as my vision is failing (even though I am only in my 30′s) and I have been struggling reading from my NASB as I preach.” It brought me such joy to send him his Bible.
While we only had 78 people selected as winners in the Great Bible Giveaway, in a way everyone is a winner. The whole purpose of the giveaway was to introduce people to our online Bible. During the promotion, we saw site traffic and usage of Bible.Logos.com increase by more than 20% and many people sent in emails thanking us for sponsoring the promotion because it was through the giveaway that they learned about the site.

One More Bible to Give Away

During the course of the giveaway, one of our winners sent his Bible back and asked that we give it away to another person. So, honoring his request, here’s one last chance to win. Leave a comment on this blog post with your favorite Bible verse. On Monday (Jan 18) we’ll select a winner at random from the comments.
NOTE: Our randomly selected winner is Billy Stevens. While you can no longer enter to win, please feel free to continue posting your favorite verses in the comments below.

December Winners

  • 1 ESV Study Bible, Black Calfskin (Retail $239.99) from Crossway (winner: E. Amerman)
  • 6 HCSB Legacy Bibles, Black Genuine Leather (Retail $100) from B&H Publishing (winners: J. Rozema, G. Stadler, R. Mills, A. Manning, M. Macaluso, and D. Mora)
  • 1 KJV Cambridge Premier Concord Reference, Black Goatskin (Retail $199.99) from Cambridge Bibles (winner: R. DuBois)
  • 1 NASB In Touch Ministries Wide Margin Edition, Burgundy Calfskin (Retail $149.99) from Lockman Foundation (winner: P. Robin)
  • 1 NASB Large Print Ultrathin Reference, Black Calfskin (Retail $149.99) from Lockman Foundation (winner: D. Buckham)
  • 1 NASB Side Column Reference Wide Margin Special Limited Edition, Black Calfskin (Retail $149.99) from Lockman Foundation (winner: J. Swain)
  • 1 NIV Archaeological Study Bible, Venetian Brown Renaissance Fine Leather (Retail $109.99) from Zondervan (winner: A. Beaver)
  • 1 NIV Study Bible, Black Renaissance Fine Leather (Retail $124.99) from Zondervan (winner: A. Bartlett)
  • 1 NIV Study Bible, Burgundy Goatskin ($229.99) from Cambridge Bibles (winner: E. Hernandez)
  • 1 NKJV UltraThin Bible Signature Series, Tan Calfskin (Retail $129.99) from Thomas Nelson (winner: A. Dobuss)
  • 2 NLTSB Tyndale Select, Black Calfskin (Retail Unavailable) from Tyndale (winners: J. Hoffman and D. Larson)
  • 1 TNIV, Black Renaissance Fine Leather ($99.99) from Zondervan (winner: R. Irvin)

Special Thanks!

A very special thanks to Crossway, Cambridge, Lockman Foundation, Zondervan, Thomas Nelson, Tyndale, and B&H Publishing for working with us to make your beautifully crafted Bibles available for this giveaway!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

Biblical People: My New Favorite Feature

One of the things I love about Logos 4 is its ability to take something conceptual and make it visual. Logos 4 does this with the help of topographical and interactive maps, high-resolution infographics, Visual Filters, various types of Passage Analysis, as well as many other diagrams, charts, and graphs.

One feature that I find myself returning to often is Biblical People. Biblical People makes understanding complex lineages as well as other interpersonal relationships in the Bible easier by providing diagrams of family trees and links to Scripture references pertaining to that individual throughout the Bible. All of those genealogies, that I might gloss over, suddenly begin to make sense. For a visual learner such as myself, there is no way to communicate the world that is unlocked by features such as this.

One of the great things about a feature like Biblical People is its accessibility from anywhere I am in Logos 4.

Let’s say I am reading in Exodus and I am interested in seeing Moses’s genealogy. All I need to do is right-click on his name, select Person from the window that opens (screenshot) and then choose Biblical People from the top left of the next window. It’s that easy, and it opens up in a separate window so I can have it available while I continue in the text.

Another easy way to access Biblical People is through the Passage Guide. When I put Moses’s birth and adoption story (Exodus 2:1-10) into the Passage Guide, it searches My Library and opens up all relevant Commentaries, Cross References, Parallel Passages, and a host of other important tools including Biblical People. In the preview pane for Biblical People (screenshot) you get a preview of artwork and archaeology that follows the verse theme as well as various trees and visuals that fit with that theme, too, including Slavery in Egypt, Joseph Sold as a Slave, and family trees for Moses, Miriam, Levi, and Kohath.

From the home page you can go right to Biblical People by choosing Tools and clicking on Biblical People under the Bible Facts header (screenshot).

Once I am in the Biblical People window there is so much useful information laid out in an uncluttered fashion. Across the top I have a quick explanation of who Moses is, a list of his relatives (clicking on any of their names opens up a new Biblical People for that character), dictionary entries from the dictionaries in My Library, and a collection of Biblical Things associated with Moses (Tent of Meeting, Burning Bush, Golden Calf, Bronze Serpent, etc.).

The center of the pane has Moses’s Family Tree. I can customize the look of the graphic with seven variants, and the scroll wheel on my mouse can adjust the size of the Family Tree. By clicking the Biblical People icon on the upper left, I can copy, print, or even send the graphic to a PowerPoint presentation.

Across the bottom runs a ribbon of associated Family Trees like Aaron, Ithamar, and Eleazar. There are also visual representations of the individuals involved in significant events in the life of Moses (screenshot). You will even find a graphic listing the Psalm Authors, which includes Moses of course. At the bottom of the Biblical People window for Moses there are 26 more associated Biblical People graphics along with 20 related works of art. It is no small feat that all of this information is laid out in such a clean and unobtrusive fashion.

This is just a peek into my new favorite feature, one that really makes Logos 4 pop. Seeing a visual representation of the various relationships in the Scriptures really cements the significance of so many people, events, and families. What makes Logos 4 so ingenious is not just the amazing amount of information but the intuitive, imaginative and graceful way that information is presented.

Biblical People is a feature that is not available in the Christian Home Library package. This is a great reason to consider upgrading if you currently have the Christian Home Library (not to mention the 144 resources you’ll get by jumping up one rung to the Bible Study Library). Take a look at the custom upgrader to see the special pricing designed to take you to the next level of Bible study.

Pre-Pubs Shipping Soon!

Tyndale Commentaries CD-ROM (49 Vols.)

Our number one priority for the past couple months has been the launch of Logos 4 and keeping our customers happy. We’ve devoted our entire company to ensuring that this happens.

Now that Logos 4 is launched, our electronic text department has returned to some other projects. They are wrapping up several Pre-Pub books and collections, and many are projected to ship in the next few weeks.

You still have a little more time to pick up some great books at a steep discount. Don’t pass up these deals!

Speaking of discounts, don’t miss out on the Logos 4 introductory discounts. The introductory offer expires soon, so don’t wait!

Morris, How Do I…?

Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1

Monday’s posts are usually from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Today we introduce the Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1, by mp|Seminars. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

The all-new Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1 is here, complete with step-by-step instructions and helpful screenshots to guide you visually!

This 27-section manual, the most thorough manual to date, covers everything you need to become familiar with the new Logos Bible Software 4. Morris starts by giving you an overview of the Logos 4 desktop to familiarize you with the User Interface. From there, he provides an introduction to the Home Page and Home Page Bible Study before diving into sections on the Passage Guide, the Exegetical Guide, the Bible Study Guide and so much more.

Like attending Camp Logos, Morris provides plenty of tips and reminders which will allow your Bible study to become more productive as you learn timesaving tips and keyboard shortcuts, more focused as you learn how to access the specific Bibles, commentaries, and resources pertaining to your areas of interest, and more fruitful as you spend more time studying and less time searching for study material.

After you order your copy of the Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1, round out your training by watching our training videos, and of course, check the Camp Logos Calendar for the next event near you.

Offline Reading with Logos iPhone App Version 1.2.2

iphone-small.pngLast week in Kent’s post, How to Get the Most Out of the Logos iPhone App, he told you how anyone with the Logos iPhone app could instantly access around 30 Bibles to read on their iPhone or iPod Touch, and that by registering (for free) you gain access to more than 30 additional free books.

He also pointed out that if you upgrade to a new Logos 4 base package, you get access to all the books that you have ever purchased for Logos Bible Software (as long as our publishing partners have given us permission to display each title), followed by a bullet-point list of reasons the app is more than a book reader.

Here’s one more reason: The Logos App now offers offline reading.

This is awesome news, especially for those who do not have a constant internet connection. To make this possible, you’ll still need an internet connection to save the books locally, but once the books are saved, you can read them without a wireless connection. So before you head to your small group, your men’s or women’s Bible study, out to the park, or if you’d just like to sink into your favorite chair and read your Bible or favorite commentary, make sure you make your preferred Bible translation and other favorite books available offline.

For those of you who are determined to make 2010 the year you read through the entire Bible, what better way to accomplish that goal then with the free Logos Bible Software app? The offline reading mode will allow you to take advantage of your down-time, and before you know it, the few verses or few chapters you are able to read while waiting for your next meeting or class will quickly add up.

So here’s how it’s done:

  1. Make sure you’re connected to the internet via Wi-Fi or your carrier.
  2. Open your library.
  3. Click on the blue arrow next to the title you want available offline. (screenshot)
  4. Slide the "Available Offline" option to On. (screenshot)
  5. Click Done.
  6. You should see an orange arrow indicating that Logos is downloading the resource. (screenshot)
  7. Once the resource is completely downloaded, the arrow will change to an airplane icon. (screenshot)
  8. After the book is completely downloaded, in offline mode, select Read and it will be viewable offline.

For those of you who use Facebook and are excited about this functionality, but still don’t have an iPod Touch, find out how you can enter to win a free 8GB iPod Touch.

*The offline reading mode is only available if you own a Logos 4 base package. You can read and navigate books in offline mode, but you can’t search or access them in reports like the Passage Guide, Bible Word Study, and Text Comparison.

Göttingen Septuagint (LXX), Now With Provisional Morphology

In November of 2010, we released the introductory material, text and apparatuses of the highly-acclaimed Göttingen Septuagint.
We’d planned on releasing the fully morphologically analyzed text, but weren’t able to release it at that time. Due to the importance of the apparatus material, we decided it was worth shipping the product without the morphological analysis, and updating later as the analysis became available. As I mentioned in a previous post about the Lexham LXX Interlinear, the Septuagint is big. The material available for Göttingen is more than three times the size of the New Testament.
Since then, we’ve had some breakthroughs and are thrilled to be able to release a provisional edition of the Göttingen Septuagint with morphological analysis. Nearly 99% of the words in the text are analyzed, with morphology and lemma information; the vast majority of those have English gloss information as well. If you’re a Logos 4 user and have already purchased the Göttingen Septuagint, then the updates have likely already downloaded for you.
What do you mean by “Provisional”?
That’s a good question. What we mean by “provisional” is that we’ve done a load of analysis and comparison with our existing Septuagint morphology (used in the Lexham LXX Interlinear and also in the Septuagint with Logos Morphology) and where we could make reliable assumptions about agreements between the two texts, we incorporated the agreeing morphology and lemma information. This is where the “nearly 99%” number comes from. For areas that did not reliably agree, we used other data sets to prepopulate morphology and lemma information; these will be reviewed and corrected over the next months. As individual volumes are reviewed, updates of those volumes will be made available to Logos users who have already purchased Göttingen.
We plan to start the review process in early 2011, but since the coverage was much greater than we’d anticipated, it makes sense to release the provisional edition so that people who already have purchased the Göttingen Septuagint can begin to use the morphology. You know, use features like:

  • Morphological Searching
  • Lemma-based KeyLinking
  • Morphological Visual Filters
  • Sympathetic Highlighting

While some portions will be reviewed and corrected during this process, the vast majority of the analysis is reliable as it presently stands. Some of the alternate resources (the “alpha” text of Esther and the alternate text of Habakkuk 3) have no analogue in other LXX editions, so the tagging on these is in a much more provisional state than the rest of the material.
Note for Mac Users: This is a 4.2 only update. Mac users on 4.0b will continue to use the older versions of the resources. Mac users on 4.2 beta will be able to use the resources. If a Mac user is on 4.0b and wants to have the provisional morph edition, then they can install the beta, and the resources should automatically follow.
Enjoy these updates to your Göttingen Septuagint; and thanks for being patient with us while we make these resources even better!

Win a Free iPod Touch

iphone-small.pngOne of the cool features of our new Bible study iPhone app is that it can also be run on an iPod Touch. This means that you don’t have to change cell phone carriers or buy an expensive iPhone just to get this great Bible study tool. On top of that, we’ve recently added an offline reading mode that allows you to store some of your book on your device and read them without even being connected to WiFi or a mobile carrier.* Logos on the iPod Touch is even more useful than before.
We’re so excited about the advances our app is taking that we decided to buy some iPod Touches and give them away! In fact, if you follow Logos on Twitter you know that we’ve given two of these iPods away already. Our current iPod Touch giveaway is being run for all our Facebook fans. So, if you’re on Facebook, head over and see how you can enter to win.
If you like giveaways like this one, be sure to become a fan of Logos on Facebook and that you’re following Logos on Twitter. It is a great way to keep up to date with Logos and hear about cool things like iPod giveaways.

*Downloading a book to your iPod or iPhone for offline reading requires an internet connection via WiFi or through your cell phone provider.