Archive - June, 2009

Using RefTagger with Bible.Logos.com and Ref.ly Links

By default RefTagger will tag only the bare Bible references on your site. If a Bible reference is already linked to Bible.Logos.com or another online Bible site, RefTagger will ignore it. So you won’t get the cool tooltips to show up on references you’ve already linked manually.

We’ve received some feedback from people who want to be able to link Bible references to Bible.Logos.com and have RefTagger add the tooltips, so we’ve decided to add support for it. It also works with Ref.ly links, which is perfect if you syndicate your Twitter feed to your blog.

Here are a couple of examples:

All you need to do to enable this new functionality is add one additional line of code to the RefTagger script code in the footer of your site. Simply add

Logos.ReferenceTagging.lbsConvertHyperlinks = true;

to the RefTagger JavaScript code anywhere before the line

Logos.ReferenceTagging.tag();

This will tell RefTagger to add tooltips to all of the Bible references that are hard linked to Bible.Logos.com or Ref.ly.

Why would you want to do this? Well, since RefTagger uses JavaScript, Bible references in your site’s feed don’t get linked because the JavaScript code runs only on your site, not in your readers’ feed reader (e.g., Google Reader or Bloglines). If you want your Bible references to be linked in your feed, you’ll have to link them manually (or use this hack to save a little time). Before, you had to choose between linking your Bible references to Bible.Logos.com or using RefTagger. Now you can do both and enjoy the best of both worlds.

Searching the John Piper Sermon Manuscript Library by Topic

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As mentioned in a previous blog, Logos released The John Piper Sermon Manuscript Library. Here’s how to locate sermons on a particular topic or passage from the library:

  • After installing the sermon library click the small black arrow next to the Home icon on the toolbar
  • Choose Sermons from John Piper from the list of Home pages
  • When his Home Page opens click the Browse tab

Now you can browse his sermons by Series, Topic, Occasion, or Scripture!

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

ESV Study Bible Coming to Logos

ESV Study BibleThe ESV Study Bible from Crossway is one of the best study Bibles on the market. This carefully crafted volume packs in 2 million words (including the ESV Bible text), 20,000 notes, 50+ articles, 200+ charts, 200+ full-color maps, 80,000 cross-references, 40 illustrations, and more. The ESVSB brings together a wealth of evangelical scholarship in a concise and refreshing way and is sure to help you understand God’s Word better.

This award-winning study Bible is about to get even better. It’s now available on our Pre-Pub page in two different versions—a notes-only version for those who already own the ESV Bible (which is included in all of our base packages) and a complete version for those who do not yet have the ESV.

The Logos edition of the ESV Study Bible puts the Bible text in one resource and all of the other content in a second resource. This enables you to view the Bible and study Bible content side by side—and even scroll synchronously when both resources share the same link set. The ESV Study Bible Notes resource will function just like any other commentary and will show up in the Passage Guide along with your favorite study Bibles and commentaries. So no matter what passage you’re studying, the ESV Study Bible with all of its rich content is always just a click away.

Watch the video below to find out why you should add the ESVSB to your digital library.

Copying Bible Text without Footnotes

Most Bible translations have a variety of footnotes throughout the text, giving you instant access to cross references, alternate translations, text-critical notes, and more. These notes are helpful when studying the Bible on your computer, but you may not need them when you copy the text into a sermon or paper.

A fairly common question we hear from new users is how to copy text from a Bible without including the internal footnotes. Let’s take Romans 12:1–2 in the ESV, for example.

You’ll notice 10 notes in these two verses. The superscript letters are for cross references, and the superscript numbers are for alternate translations, comments on manuscripts, etc. Sometimes you may want to include these when copying and pasting, but often you want just the bare Bible text.

There are three ways to accomplish this.

Method 1: Switch to “Bible Text Only” Viewing Mode.

With your Bible open and active, go to the View menu and select “Bible Text Only.” This will strip out all footnotes and allow you to copy only the text with chapter and verse numbers. The downside to this method is that you lose the paragraphing; each verse is formatted as its own paragraph.

Method 2: Uncheck “Include Footnotes When Copying.”

Another option is to go to Tools > Options > General > Interface and uncheck the box “Include Footnotes When Copying.” This will tell Libronix to skip any internal footnotes when copying text from your resources. Formatting and paragraphing will be preserved, but the potential downside to this method is that it applies to all resources and not just Bibles. So if you like having footnotes appear when you copy text from a commentary, for example, then you’ll want to try the next method.

Method 3: Use the “Copy Bible Verses” Tool.

This final method is far and away the best. If you’ve paid careful attention to the icons in your system tray (which is usually in the lower right corner of your screen next to the time), you’ve probably noticed that Libronix adds three icons when it’s open. The black one that looks like a Bible is the Copy Bible Verses tool.

There are two ways to use this powerful tool. You can double-click on the icon in your system tray, type in a passage, and click “Copy” (or “Copy and Paste” to send it directly to your open Word document, for example). Or you can highlight the text you want to copy and select “Copy Romans 12:1-2 to Clipboard” (instead of selecting “Copy” or using Ctrl+c).

One of the cool features of the Copy Bible Verses tool is that you can create as many different styles as you want—one for your sermons, another for your blog posts, another for papers, etc. For additional help creating styles, see the training article “Copy Text without Footnotes and Citations.”

If you copy Bible text frequently, you’ll quickly come to love this very handy little tool. It’s not hard to see why this is some users’ favorite feature.

People behind the Product: Meet the Anchor Yale Bible Team

The Anchor Yale Bible was our biggest Pre-Pub ever in terms of its size, the number of hours it took to get it from print to digital, and the team assembled to tackle it.

Pictured below are the folks in our Electronic Text Development department who did the lion’s share of the work.

Several others are not pictured here because they forgot to wear their t-shirts! Many more were involved in other ways like working with the publisher and doing things like marketing, sales, testing, shipping, and support.

Since this was a special Pre-Pub, we did something out of the ordinary. One of our artists designed a t-shirt that those who worked closely on the project received. Here’s a close-up of someone wearing his new t-shirt proudly.

I know some of you are thinking how much you’d like to add this to your wardrobe. Well, if you wear a medium, you just might be able to. We have three medium t-shirts left. If you bought the Anchor Yale Bible and want one of these cool shirts, leave a comment below. We’ll randomly pick out three winners and send out the shirts in the next day or two.

Goliath and the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament

“Goliath and the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament” — at BibleStudyMagazine.comWas Goliath really nine-and-a-half feet tall? Did David actually kill Goliath? A new interactive article from BibleStudyMagazine.com has the answers.

In “Clash of the Manuscripts: Goliath and the Hebrew text of the Old Testament,” which appeared on pages 33–35 of the May–June issue of Bible Study Magazine, Dr. Michael Heiser discusses two textual problems that have bearing on the height and death of Goliath. Looking at all of the data, Dr. Heiser shows how to reconcile the conflicting sources.

Read the article to find out if your Sunday school teacher was right.

If you enjoy the article and want to share it on your blog, just copy the HTML code at the bottom of the page.

To see the previous interactive articles, be sure to visit the Interactive page.

Copying Biblical People

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

When you generate a Passage Guide (PG) report, one of the sections you may see is Biblical People (BP). BP is an automated report that displays a relationship graph of anyone mentioned in your passage.

To open the report just click one of the ovals (nodes) containing someone’s name. The report builds for the name of the person you clicked.

To copy this image to another program like PowerPoint right click in a blank white area near the BP reportand select Copy. Go to the other program and Paste the image (Ctrl + V).

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Join Us at the New Logos Bible Software Forums

Since 2002 we’ve had an active group of users on our newsgroups. After much deliberation we’ve decided that it’s time to make the switch to web forums. We’ve been testing them with a small group for a couple of weeks, and now we’re ready to invite you to come join the discussions at the new Logos Bible Software Forums.

Continue Reading…

People behind the Product: Meet Rick Brannan

Rick Brannan is no stranger to longtime users and readers of the Logos blog. He’s been with Logos since 1993 and is approaching his 16th anniversary of employment with the company. Rick is an information architect in our design and editorial department and blogs at Ricoblog and PastoralEpistles.com.

Though he’s a regular contributor to the Logos blog and has done dozens of videos, most of his posts and videos are about Greek and not about Rick. In this People behind the Product video, you’ll get to find out a little bit about one of Logos’ earliest employees.

Other Posts about Rick:

Logos User Survey

We do our best to listen to our users through a variety of channels: comments you leave here on the blog, emails you send to suggest@logos.com, suggestions you share in our newsgroups—and now in our new web forums—and many more. We read all user feedback and make sure it gets to the appropriate department for consideration. Some of our best ideas come from our users.

Thank you for letting your voice be heard. Listening to what you want helps us to provide you with the best Bible software in the world.

Continue Reading…

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