Resources on the Death and Resurrection of Jesus

Easter weekend is my favorite time of the year because it provides an occasion for focused reflection on the historical events that are at the heart of the gospel and the Christian faith—the death and resurrection of Jesus by the Father through the Spirit (cf. Rom 8:11).

Paul in 1 Corinthians 15 describes these events as being of “first importance”:

Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, 2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain. 3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, 4 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, 5 and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. 6 Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. 7 Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. 8 Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me.

Notice that it is the gospel of the death and resurrection of Jesus in which we as Christians stand (and apart from which we fall) and by which we continue to be saved as we hold fast to these central truths.

This weekend as you take some extra time to read through the Gospel accounts (perhaps using the Parallel Passages and Harmonies tool) and mediate on other portions of Scripture relating to the death and resurrection of Jesus, you may have some time to read some reflections by others. If you’re looking for reading material, here is a list of some of the books available for Logos that may provide you with some fruitful mediation:

There are a handful of other titles on Pre-Pub right now that deal with these important events. But these will have to wait for a future Easter weekend’s reading.

Finally, we just put Robert Candlish’s classic exposition of 1 Corinthians 15, Life in a Risen Saviour, on Community Pricing. This gem is well worth picking up—especially at the $5 price tag that it will probably go for.

Comments

  1. While many Scripture students use the term “Easter,” which has pagan origins, Messianic Hebrew Believers prefer the more scriptural less offensive word “Passover.”

  2. Thanks, David. I appreciate the comment. I typical refer to Easter as Resurrection Day and probably should have said “Passion weekend” instead of “Easter weekend.” I’m not in the habit of referring to it as Passover, but that’s definitely a biblical way to describe it!