Archive - March, 2009

New from Moody Publishers

An Updated Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint

A few months back, we released the initial version of the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint. That version included several books of the Septuagint (also known as the “LXX,” it is the Greek translation of the Old Testament, plus some apocryphal/deuterocanonical books). Our plan has always been to release more content as it becomes available.

Well, more content has become available, and we’ve updated the resource. If you already own a copy of the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint, then all you need to do is run the resource auto-update script, or if you’re on a Mac, head to the product page and download the new file. If you haven’t purchased the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint yet, then you can order your copy today. (Why would you want the Septuagint? Read this post for some answers.)

What has been updated?

Because we want to get more content out sooner, we are releasing the books in various stages of done-ness. There are two stages. The first stage is a “draft” stage, which represents the finished draft from the translator, supplied to Logos. The second stage is an “edited” stage, in which the general editor (Randall Tan) has reviewed and edited the draft-stage translation.

In the below lists, all available books are listed in their current stage.

If a title is bold, then it is new to that stage. So Genesis, Numbers, Job, Zechariah and Malachi are new to the edited stage; they were in a draft stage in the previous release. And Judith, II Maccabees, III Maccabees, Wisdom of Solomon and Jonah are new books altogether (added to the draft stage).

Books in an edited status are as follows:

  • Genesis
  • Exodus
  • Numbers
  • Ruth
  • Job
  • Psalms
  • Additional Psalm (Psalm 151)
  • Proverbs
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Song of Solomon
  • Obadiah
  • Haggai
  • Zechariah
  • Malachi
  • Letter of Jeremiah

The following books are in draft status:

  • Judith
  • II Maccabees
  • III Maccabees
  • Wisdom of Solomon
  • Psalms of Solomon
  • Jonah
  • Jeremiah
  • Baruch
  • Lamentations
  • Ezekiel

There is still a decent amount of work left to do on the remaining books, but our translators and editor have been hard at work. As more content becomes available, we will update and re-release the updated resource so that registered users can have the latest material available—of course, at no additional charge.

What Does Archaeology Say about the Fall of Jericho?

If you have never made it to one of the Logos lectures, I would really encourage you to come out to the Mount Baker Theatre on Thursday as Dr. Bryant Wood, Director of Research with the Associates for Biblical Research, will present on the topic "What Does Archaeology Say about the Fall of Jericho?"

About the Lecture

Did the walls of Jericho really come tumbling down? Biblical archaeologist Bryant Wood will present an illustrated talk on archaeological findings at Jericho, a site which has been a problem in biblical archaeology since scholars claimed that there was no city there at the time of Joshua. As a result, most archaeologists claim the Bible must be in error. Dr. Wood shows that not only was there a city at Jericho at the time of Joshua’s Conquest, but that when the findings are correctly dated, it is seen that the archaeological discoveries and the biblical narrative in Joshua 2–6 harmonize in an amazing way.

Event Details

  • Date: Thursday, March 19th
  • Time: 7:00 PM
  • Title: "What Does Archaeology Say about the Fall of Jericho?"
  • Speaker: Dr. Bryant Wood
  • Location: Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, WA
  • Admission: FREE!

About This Month’s Speaker

Dr. Wood earned an M.A. in Biblical History from the University of Michigan in 1974, and a Ph.D. in Syro-Palestinian archaeology from the University of Toronto in 1985. His extensive archaeological field work includes surveying in Jordan, Egypt, and Israel, and he has been awarded grants to carry on his research. He is a member of the Near East Archaeological Society and a Fellow of the Institute for Biblical Research. Dr. Wood is currently Director of Research with the Associates for Biblical Research, Akron, PA, and editor of their quarterly publication Bible and Spade.

Mark your calendar, tell your friends, and we will see you soon.

Update: The audio is now available on the Lecture Series page.

Registration for BibleTech:2009 Ending Soon!

Today’s guest post is from J. D. Elgin, a member of the Marketing Department and the coordinator for this year’s BibleTech conference.

BibleTech:2009 is quickly approaching—it’s on March 27–28—and we are quite excited as things come together.

Are you looking for ways to pump life into your church website? Do you want to get the most out of your blogging community or social web interface? Maybe you’re more interested in Bible translation software or what’s in store for the next generation of Bible technologies. Wherever your interests lie, be sure to secure your seat at BibleTech:2009, where you’ll learn from the experts! Registration is only $149.95 and gets you access to twenty-eight presentations, three catered meals, a conference T-shirt, and the chance get to know fellow Bible and technology geeks! Registration is accessible through the conference website.

BibleTech:2009 will consist of fourteen sessions split between March 27 and 28. Each session will give you the option of a high-tech presentation or a low-tech presentation. The high-tech presentations will discuss the latest developments in Bible software platforms and the use of computer-based technologies for Bible translation and Bible study. The low-tech presentations will handle issues of design sensitivity, current trends in Bible technologies, and the integration of the Bible with internet-based communities.

A list of conference speakers is available on the conference website. Get acquainted with the speakers and catch up on their preparations for BibleTech:2009 by checking out their personal blogs. You can also view the official BibleTech:2009 schedule and plan ahead for your BibleTech experience.

Registration for BibleTech:2009 ends on Monday, March 23, so reserve your spot now!

Join us on March 27 and 28 in Seattle, WA for BibleTech:2009!

Can’t make it out to Seattle this year? Stay tuned to the Logos Blog for ways you can keep up with BibleTech:2009.

Become a Logos Ambassador

Logos Ambassador ProgramAre you passionate about Logos? Do you have a desire to introduce others to your favorite Bible software? Are you looking for a little extra income or help building your digital library? If this describes you, then the Logos Ambassador Program might be a perfect fit.

Almost daily we meet people who have never heard about us and wonder where we’ve been all of their lives. We use just about every means possible to let people know about us (e.g., websites, blogs, email, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, radio ads and interviews, TV interviews, conferences, web ads, print ads, Bible Study Magazine, etc.), but we can only reach so many. We count on our happy customers to spread the word to family, friends, and colleagues.

Many of you are already great promoters, and we appreciate all that you do to spread the word about Logos. Why not take advantage of the opportunity to make a little extra money or build your digital library doing what you already love to do? When you present Logos to friends, family, and others in your community, you’ll earn 15% (if taken as a check) or 30% (if taken as Logos credit) commission of the sale price for every base package that you sell! This could provide some nice supplemental income or help you afford that next collection you were hoping to add to your digital library. The beauty of the program is that you can work as much or as little as you want, so the Ambassador Program can be a perfect fit no matter how much extra time you have.

Getting started is easy. Visit the Ambassador page, read the details and FAQs, and send in your application with your one-time payment of $39.95, which covers the cost of the Startup Kit. We’ll notify you as soon as you’ve been approved and send the Startup Kit to you. It contains all the essentials that you’ll need to do your presentations, take orders, and start making a little extra income.

Is the Ambassador Program right for you? Go find out!

Ancient Wars: Best-Documented, Most Controversial Biblical Event Made Interactive

Today’s guest post is from John Barry, the associate editor and project manager for Bible Study Magazine.

http://www.biblestudymagazine.com/images/sennacheribthumb.jpgThe Assyrian King Sennacherib’s invasion of Hezekiah’s Judah in 701 BC is one of the best-documented and most controversial events in the Bible and archaeology. The story “should be on Hollywood’s big-screen, because it is so full of drama, intrigue, big battle scenes, and surprising twists of plot” (Broyles, BSM Nov–Dec 2008, pg. 27). To help you investigate the diverse, discrepant accounts we have created an interactive online map to accompany Dr. Craig C. Broyles’ articles in the first three issues of Bible Study Magazine (the third article is online for free at BibleStudyMagazine.com). This event involves a new hope, an empire striking back and the return of the Angel of the Lord.

A New Hope. After the death of the Assyrian King Sargon II in 705 BC, a new hope of freedom emerges in the minds of several kings whose countries were militarily forced to serve the Assyrian empire, and a rebel alliance is created. Judah’s King Hezekiah joins the insurgents (2 Kgs 18:7).

The Empire Strikes Back. The newly appointed Assyrian King Sennacherib does not tolerate this rebellion—he strikes back and invades Hezekiah’s Judah in 701 BC. In the events leading up to King Sennacherib’s invasion, Hezekiah appeals to the Egyptians for aid, instead of Yahweh. Isaiah, a prophet living in Jerusalem, opposes Hezekiah’s political maneuvers, declaring that Yahweh abhors his alliance and that it will not help save Judah (Isa 30:2, 7, 31:1).

Sennacherib destroys most of Judah, including the prophet Micah’s hometown of Moresheth. Micah views the events as God’s divine judgment (Mic 1:8–16). Sennacherib recorded these events in a prism, dating to 689 BC, discovered in his palace. In the prism, he states “I locked [Hezekiah] up with Jerusalem, his royal city, like a bird in a cage” (cf. 2 Kgs 18:13–14). In a desperate measure to make Sennacherib leave Jerusalem alone, Hezekiah pays tribute to Sennacherib. This would usually not be enough for Sennacherib—he deposes, humiliates and replaces rebellious kings. In spite of Sennacherib attributing unqualified victory to himself in his prism, he does none of these things. He just moves on to crush other rebel alliances. The dark side has clearly put spin on the events. So, what went on here?

The Return of the Jedi. In the “bird . . . cage” of Jerusalem, Isaiah declares that Yahweh will rescue the city (2 Kgs 19:6–7, 22, 32–24; cf. Isa 37:6–7, 23, 33–35), and it happens. Egyptian forces approach Sennacherib, causing him to leave Jerusalem (2 Kgs 10:6‑9a; cf. 19:28, 33). The Assyrian forces then engage the Egyptians, but something unexpected occurs, they “abandon . . . their position and suffer . . . severe losses during their retreat,” according to the fifth century BC Greek historian Herodotus. Could it be that a “Jedi” has returned? “The Bible attributes this setback to ‘the angel of the LORD’ (2 Kgs 19:35), Herodotus to ‘thousands of field mice’ ” (Broyles, BSM Jan–Feb 2009, pg. 25). These events, though based only on circumstantial evidence, help us to determine why Sennacherib failed to take Jerusalem and depose Hezekiah, like he did with other kings.

These diverse, discrepant accounts give us a panoramic perspective on God’s Word, allowing for us to hear it through multiple voices.

Go investigate the story for yourself, and be sure to check out the interactive map. Then tell others about it on your blog, via email, or social network. We have made it easy with an already set-up linkable HTML code at the bottom of the page and social networking buttons at the top.

This is just one of the many excellent articles in the March–April issue of Bible Study Magazine. Subscribe now to read the others.

What’s Your Story?

I love reading stories about how people experience Logos Bible Software for the first time. Just yesterday I read a glowing email from a professor who a few months ago had never used Logos and thought it was little more than a collection of PDF-like books. He was absolutely blown away when he first tried Logos and saw its powerful searching abilities and the quality of texts in the particular collection that he got.

We’re going to start a series of posts here on the blog featuring stories like this. In the past we’ve asked you to send your stories to NewsWire@logos.com and promised that if we used yours, we’d give you $100 worth of unlocks as a “thank you.”

If you’ve never told us your story, we’d love to hear from you. Tell us a little about yourself and how and why you use Logos. Include how you found out about Logos and what the main influences were that led you to purchase it. Include anything that makes for a good story. Write it up and send it to NewsWire@logos.com. Your story could be the next one to be featured.

Continue Reading…

Nearly 100 John MacArthur Books!

We put together a new page at Logos.com recently that features all of the books of John MacArthur that we sell—nearly 100 total! In addition to his commentaries and Bible study guides on almost every book in the NT, you’ll find books covering spiritual gifts, heaven, family, parenting, counseling, Bible study, preaching, leadership, and a host of other topics.

John MacArthur, the pastor–teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California for more than 40 years and a regular conference speaker, has had a profound impact on conservative evangelical churches and Christians all over the country (and world) through his extensive preaching and writing ministries.

There’s no better way to read and study John MacArthur’s writings than in the Libronix Digital Library System. Finding out what MacArthur says on just about any topic or passage is a cinch with Libronix’s powerful searching capabilities.

While you could pick out all of the titles that interest you one by one, the most economical way to add MacArthur’s works to your digital library is by picking up the MacArthur LifeWorks and Commentaries Bundle, which includes more than 70 books and study guides for under $5 per volume.

Go have a look at the new page at www.logos.com/macarthur.

Look up Cross References with a Commentary

Today’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Did you know that you can have a Bible and commentary look up your Bible cross references? Choose Tools | Options | KeyLink. Select Bible as the Data Type. Click KeyLinking. Set Number of Windows to Open on a KeyLink to 2. Select your favorite Bible and click Promote. Do the same for your favorite commentary. Click Close. Now when you click a blue Bible cross reference in an e-book both your Bible and commentary will jump to that location!

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

BibleTech:2009 Sneak Peek

Today’s guest blogger is J. D. Elgin, a member of the Marketing Department and the coordinator for this year’s BibleTech conference.

BibleTech:2009 is shaping up to be an incredible event for anyone passionate about the latest developments in Bible and technology! But don’t take our word for it; check out what some of the speakers are saying. As they are busy preparing their presentations, several have leaked details through their personal blogs. We decided to give you a BibleTech:2009 sneak peek by posting links to some of these blog posts.

Remember, BibleTech:2009 is March 27–28 in Seattle. If you’re making your plans to join us, be sure to register soon.

Recently, speaker Gabe Taviano interviewed me about BibleTech:2009. The podcast interview is available from iTunes or on the GodsMac.com website. The interview is about fifteen minutes long and begins at 26:00 into the podcast. Thanks to Gabe for helping us get the word out! You can also read about Gabe’s presentation on GabeTaviano.com, where he shares his passion for digital ministry and the effective use of technology for the Kingdom.

Wes Allen is a pastor on the East Coast. His presentation is entitled “Sermon Painting: Using Digital Projection to Illustrate a Sermon.” Wes has prepared a nice video promo to entice you. If you have any interest in preparing an effective presentation, you won’t want to miss Wes’ discussion!

Ellen Frankel of Jewish Publication Society (JPS) will present the latest digital initiative from JPS. Her presentation, “How the Ancient Rabbis Invented Web 2.0 Before Its Time,” explores how an online platform can produce a unique social experience for reading the Hebrew Bible. The official announcement is available at the Yavnet blog.

Mike Aubrey will demonstrate the functionality of SIL’s FLeX language program. Mike will illustrate the power of software for Greek studies and translation work. You can follow his preparations on his blog, ΕΝ ΕΦΕΣΩ.

Rick Brannan’s study, Stylometry and the Septuagint: Applying Anthony Kenny’s Stylometric Study to the LXX, applies a method of statistical analysis previously used on the Greek New Testament to the Septuagint (the Greek translation of the Old Testament). Your can track Rick’s progress on his personal blog, where you’ll find his early musings and some recent findings.

For more on the these and other BibleTech:2009 speakers, check out the BibleTech:2009 website and view the complete conference schedule.

Are you unable to attend BibleTech:2009? We are putting together a list of speakers who will be blogging during the event. Stay tuned to the Logos blog for the official BibleTech:2009 blogger list. You can also keep up with BibleTech by joining our BibleTech Facebook group or by following the conference on Twitter (#BibleTech09).

We look forward to seeing you in Seattle!

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