Adding RefTagger to a phpBB Forum Site

Over the weekend I got an email from a forum moderator in Australia who convinced the admins to add RefTagger to their site. He requested that we provide some instructions specific to phpBB, which is popular free forum software.

So for all you phpBB forum users out there, here’s how to add RefTagger. (You need to be an admin to do this, so if you’re not, just pass these instructions on to the guys who control the site.)

  1. Log in and navigate to your admin panel (http://yoursite.com/adm/).
  2. Click on the “Styles” tab at the top, and then click on “Templates” in the left sidebar.
  3. Find your template, and click “Edit.”
  4. Click the drop-down and select “overall_footer.html” under the “overall” section.
  5. Scroll down to the bottom of the code and paste the customizable RefTagger code from the RefTagger page right before the </body> tag.
  6. Click “Submit.”

You’re done. With just a few minutes of work, RefTagger is now doing its thing on your entire site! It doesn’t matter if your site is new or 10 years old or whether you have hundreds or millions of Bible references. You’ll see the results instantly on any page you navigate to on your site.

If you frequent a forum that has lots of Bible references, why not contact the admins and ask them to add RefTagger? We’re happy to provide instructions for other platforms as well. Just let us know: reftagger@logos.com.

New Books from IVP!

IVP Biblical Theology Collection (4 Vols.)We added some new titles from IVP to the Pre-Pub page last week. IVP publishes a lot of quality books, many of which are available for Libronix. We’re excited to be able to expand our offerings with these 17 new volumes.

IVP Biblical Theology Collection (4 Vols.)

  • A Concise New Testament Theology, I. Howard Marshall
  • Old Testament Theology, Paul R. House
  • Old Testament Theology, Vol. 1: Israel’s Gospel, John Goldingay
  • Old Testament Theology, Vol. 2: Israel’s Faith, John Goldingay

This set will provide you with some key biblical theology texts for exploring the the message of Scripture as it is progressively unfolded in each of the books of the Bible.

IVP Evangelical Theology Collection (11 Vols.)IVP Evangelical Theology Collection (11 Vols.)

  • Ancient Faith for the Church’s Future, ed. Mark Husbands and Jeffrey P. Greenman
  • Biblical Theology: Retrospect and Prospect, ed. Scott J. Hafemann
  • Care for the Soul: Exploring the Intersection of Psychology & Theology, ed. Mark R. McMinn and Timothy R. Phillips
  • Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World, ed. Timothy R. Phillips and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Evangelicals & Scripture: Tradition, Authority and Hermeneutics, ed. Vincent E. Bacote, Laura C. Miguelez, and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Justification: What’s at Stake in the Current Debates, ed. Mark Husbands and Daniel Treier
  • The Beauty of God: Theology and the Arts, ed. Daniel Treier, Mark Husbands and Roger Lundin
  • The Community of the Word: Toward an Evangelical Ecclesiology, ed. Mark Husbands and Daniel Treier
  • The Gospel in Black and White, ed. Dennis L. Okholm
  • The Nature of Confession, ed. Timothy R. Phillips and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Women, Ministry and the Gospel, ed. Mark Husbands and Timothy Larsen

Each of these books is the fruit of one of the annual Wheaton Theology Conferences. These volumes contain essays from some of the top evangelical scholars in the world and explore issues that are of special importance for the church today.

Two titles didn’t fit into a collection and are available as individual volumes:

Thanks to IVP for making all of these available!

RefTagger Now Powering More Than 1000 Sites!

We launched RefTagger at the end of February, and in the six months since it has spread to more than 1,000 websites. Read the press release that went out yesterday: “1,000+ Christian Webmasters Install RefTagger.”

You’ll now find RefTagger powering the sites of major ministries like Grace to You and Desiring God Ministries and a host of church websites like Compass Bible Church and Park Street Church. You’ll also find it on wiki sites like Theopedia and on the blogs of prominent bloggers like Doug Wilson and Ray Comfort.

No matter what kind of site you run or how much traffic you get, if your site has Bible references and you want a simple, free, time-saving solution for providing instant access to the text of Scripture, RefTagger is for you.

For most sites it can be set up in less than 5 minutes. All properly formatted Bible references—past and future—are instantly transformed. You don’t have to do a thing after the initial setup. We even provide step-by-step tutorials for a number of common platforms.

Isn’t time to add it to your site?

Search Your Collections More Quickly

Creating collections is essential to getting the most use out of your digital library. They serve two main purposes: organizing My Library and enabling more targeted and faster searching.

I have dozens of collections and use them all the time, especially for searching.

Here are some of the ways I like to group and search my digital library:

  • Author collections
  • Bible dictionaries collection
  • Biblical theology collection
  • Biographical resources collection
  • Book reviews collection
  • Church fathers collection
  • Church history collection
  • Denominational collections
  • Grammar collections
  • Systematic theologies collection
  • Systematic theology collection
  • Theological journals collection

As your number of collections increases, it can start to take longer to find the collection you’re looking for, especially if you have several collections that start with the same few letters.

What I like to do is add a unique abbreviation at the end of some of my most frequently used collections to make pulling them up when I’m searching take just a few keystrokes.

  • Barth’s Church Dogmatics | CD
  • Bible Dictionaries | BD
  • Biblical Theologies | BTs
  • Biblical Theology Tools | BTT
  • Book Reviews | BR
  • Books on Books | BB
  • Church Fathers | CF
  • Systematic Theologies | STs
  • Systematic Theology Tools | STT
  • Theological Journal Library | TJL
  • Works of John Owen | WJO

As your library continues to grow, you may have to tweak your abbreviations some. But I’ve found this to shave off a second or two every time I do a search. If you search collections frequently, you may benefit from this as well.

How to Unlock Locked Resources

I mentioned in yesterday’s blog post that you may want to keep locked resources on your hard drive so you can (1) search them and (2) find cool new resources to add to your digital library.

If you’ve managed to stumble across a locked resource that you’d like to unlock, you have several options.

For your convenience, you can unlock most resources from within the program itself. Simply click on the locked resource, and then click on “Unlock this resource…” in the window that opens.

Or click the padlock icon in the Tools menu or on your toolbar.

With the built-in unlocker, you can have your new resource unlocked and begin using it immediately.

Your other options are to head on over to Logos.com and search for the resource you want to unlock (most resources are available for immediate download) or give our sales team at jingle at 800-875-6467.

Read more about unlocking resources in this article.

Deleting Locked Resources

A couple of weeks ago I showed you how to free up some hard drive space by deleting duplicate resources. There’s another way to make even more space available: deleting locked resources.

Searching Locked Resources

Now, before I show you how to do that, I should tell you that there is actually a very good reason for keeping locked resources on your hard drive. You may not know this, but you can actually search the contents of locked resources as well. Libronix will even give you the page numbers where the hits for your search occur!

This is helpful for two reasons:

  1. If you have the book in print, you can pull it off your shelf and find exactly what you’re looking for—far more powerful and far easier to use than typical indexes, which the print book may not even have.
  2. You may find other resources that you don’t have in Libronix or in print that deal with a topic or passage that you’re studying that you might want to add to your library.

But if you don’t plan to search your locked resources and need to free up some space, you may want to delete them.

Do You Have Locked Resources?

To find out if you have locked resources on your computer, open My Library and select “All Locked Resources” under the “Collection” drop-down.

Locked resources have a yellow padlock over the book icon.

How Can You Delete Them?

There are two methods for deleting locked resources.

Method 1

If you have a smaller number of locked resources, you could run a Bibliography report (Tools > Library Management > Bibliography) and set it to “All Locked Resources” and “Titles and Locations” to find the file names and locations for all of your locked resources. You could then open your resources folder (e.g., C:\Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources) and manually delete the locked resources you no longer want. (You may need to close Libronix in order to delete them.)

Method 2

If you have a larger number of locked resources, you may want to try this method. It does require that you have some free space, and it does take some time to run.

NOTE: This method is recommended only for advanced users.

  1. Open the Location Manager (Tools > Library Management > Location Manager) and select “Unlocked on Local Drives.” Enter a new destination that doesn’t have any files in it (e.g., C:\Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources\Unlocked). If the folder doesn’t exist, Libronix will automatically create it. After Libronix is done generating the list of resource, click “Copy Resources.” Libronix will copy all unlocked resources to your new folder. Be patient. It may take some time. Wait until it is completely done before proceeding.
  2. Manually delete all of the resources from your original resources folder, since it contains locked and unlocked resources. To do this, open your resources folder in Windows Explorer and select all of the resources. If your new resources folder is a subfolder of your original resources folder, make sure not to delete it or any other folders (e.g., Media). Delete only the .lbxlls files.
  3. Move all of the resources from your new resources folder back to your original resources folder and delete the new resources folder.
  4. Start Libronix and open My Library. If any of your unlocked resources are grayed out, that means that you deleted some unlocked resources as well. Don’t worry. You can restore them from your Recycle Bin. If you don’t see any grayed out unlocked resources, you can proceed to Refresh Resources (Tools > Option > General > Resource Paths). All locked resources should now be gone.

Enjoy your extra space!

Two Free Lutheran Lectionaries!

Thanks to the initiative of our friends at Concordia Publishing House, we are pleased to make available to you two Lutheran lectionaries:

  • Lutheran Service Book: One-Year Lectionary
  • Lutheran Service Book: Three-Year Lectionary

And they are absolutely free!

If you have one of our base packages that includes the Lectionary Viewer Addin (i.e., any Logos Bible Software 3 base package except for the Original Languages Library), then all you need to do is click the Download button on the Lutheran Lectionaries page or run Libronix Update from the Tools menu in Libronix.

If you have a base package that doesn’t include the Lectionary Viewer Addin, you have two options. You can purchase the Lectionary Viewer Addin for $19.95, or you can upgrade your base package to one of the latest and greatest. Visit our upgrade page to see your options.

If you have an older base package, upgrading is definitely the way to go. There are lots of resources and tools that you’re missing out on. See the 100 New Features in Logos Bible Software 3 and the Top 20 New Features.

Here’s an example of why upgrading is by far the better value. If you upgrade from Bible Study Library (QB) to Bible Study Library (ND), it will cost you only $39.90 (twice the price of the Lectionary Viewer Addin), but you will get—in addition to the Lectionary Viewer Addin—19 new resources, 2 new addins, and 3 new parallel passages! All of that for only $19.95 more!

If you already have the Lectionary Viewer Addin, visit the Lutheran Lectionaries page to get your new lectionaries. If you don’t, go check out your upgrade options.

Related Products:

Related Article:

Getting the Most Out of the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary

A while back someone sent me a question about how to use the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary to the fullest.

Any good ideas on where I can go to learn how to most effectively use this dictionary in my study process? Is there a way to integrate it into the Bible Word Study selection?

Any help would be appreciated!

I sent this user some tips, but thought this might be worthy of a blog post—especially since it’s back-to-school time and we are currently offering a 30% discount on this wonderful resource. Just use coupon code YALE to save more than $60!

Setting Up Your Keylink Preferences

First, you should set up your keylink preferences. Go to Tools > Options > Keylinks and select “English” from the “Data Type” drop-down menu. Then find the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary in the list of resources in the bottom window and “Promote” it to the top. Prioritize it wherever you’d like. If you want it to be the first resource that Libronix looks to, move it to the top of your list.

This allows you to double-click on any English word and have quick access to the AYBD entry, if there is one. (You’ll need to set AYBD as your first keylink destination or set your keylink preferences to open several keylink destinations at a time.)

This also allows you to see AYBD entries in the Bible Word Study report.

By the way, if you don’t have the updated Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary resource (formerly Anchor Bible Dictionary), you can get it by running the resource auto-update script or by downloading it directly from our FTP server.

Creating a Parallel Resource Association

You may also want to set up a custom parallel resource association of all of your Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias. This allows you to jump from the entry on “Jericho,” for example, in the AYBD to the one in other Bible dictionary like ISBE or the New Bible Dictionary by simply hitting the right arrow key. Make sure the active index is set to “Topics.”

By creating a custom parallel resource association, you get to control which resources Libronix looks to and you get to put them in whatever order you’d like.

Watch the Video!

For more tips, see our training video on Using the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary in Logos Bible Software. It’s embedded below. If you’re reading this in your email inbox or your RSS reader and don’t see the video, visit the blog post to watch it.

To add this resource to your Libronix digital library, visit the product page. And make sure to use coupon code YALE to save 30%!

Adding RefTagger to a MediaWiki Site

MediaWiki logoMediaWiki is the open source wiki software behind Wikipedia and the lesser known Theopedia, which is now powered by RefTagger. (See an example at http://www.theopedia.com/God.)

A couple of weeks ago I downloaded and installed MediaWiki so I could test it out with RefTagger. It worked very nicely.

Here’s one method for setting it up via FTP access to your site’s files:

  1. Use an FTP program like FileZilla to navigate to the folder where you installed MediaWiki.
  2. Open the "skins" folder.
  3. Locate the file for the skin you are using. The file for the default skin is MonoBook.php. Save a local copy, and a backup copy too.
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad, or your favorite code editor.
  5. Find the </body> tag and paste the customizable RefTagger code from the RefTagger page right above it.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

You’re done. RefTagger is now transforming your MediaWiki site.

For help with other sites, see the tutorials section on the RefTagger page.

Preparing a Sermon with Logos

Pastor and Logos user Mark Barnes blogs about his process for preparing a sermon. His five steps are nicely alliterated:

  1. Divide
  2. Dissect
  3. Discover
  4. Digest
  5. Disseminate

In his very helpful post, he shows how he makes use of Logos both in the dissecting and discovering steps. He uses the sentence diagramming tool to dissect the passage.

He also uses Logos to discover the meaning of the passage. In two very helpful videos (Logos Workspace [5:00] and Logos Workspace Options [4:59]), he shows you his workspace and how he puts it to use. I’d strongly encourage you to take the time to watch them both. They are full of excellent tips and tricks.

Not only does he lay out his process, but he also walks you through it with his sermon on Amos 2:4-16 and shares the final product in both PDF and audio. Be sure to check it out.

Very nice work, Mark. Thanks for sharing!

If you use Logos in your sermon prep and would like to share your process or workspace, drop a note in the comments. We’d love to see it.