NA27 vs. UBS4: What’re the Differences?

Have you ever wondered what the differences are between the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, 27th ed. (NA27) and the United Bible Societies Greek New Testament, 4th ed. (UBS4) or between the various Greek New Testaments available for Libronix? Wonder no more. Rick Brannan has done extensive comparative analysis between these two popular editions of the Greek New Testament and gives you all of the details in this very informative article “NA27 vs. UBS4 (Greek New Testaments).” He also helpfully compares our various Greek New Testament texts.

I turned to Rick on a question a while back regarding a difference between the NA27 and UBS4 and quickly learned that Rick really knows his stuff on this. I think Rick’s article would make excellent required reading for Greek students (and professors!).

Go give it a read, and be sure to bookmark it for future reference.

Searching Footnotes in the NET Bible

I read a request last week from someone wishing for a way to search the footnotes in the NET Bible. If you’re familiar with the NET Bible, you know how valuable the notes are. While you probably normally want to see notes when you’re looking at a specific passage of Scripture, sometimes you may want to search them for particular words or phrases.

If you own one of our base packages, then it’s very likely that you have the NET Bible with notes. (The Christian Home Library is the only base package that doesn’t include the NET Bible.)

To search just the footnote text, you would want to use a field search. Simply put footnote: before the word or phrase you’d like to search for. Make sure to use the Basic Search rather than the Bible Search (or Bible Speed Search), since the Bible Search by default excludes footnotes (i.e., everything but Bible text). A search like this will return results only in the footnote text and eliminate everything else.

“Be kind to your older folks.”

Last week I got an email with the subject line “Be kind to your older folks.” Good advice, and biblical too (1 Tim 5:1-2; cf. v. 8). Here’s what she had to say:

Would you please be kind to us older folks whose eyes are not as sharp as they used to be? You young programmers love 10 pt. fonts for some reason which I have never understood. Are you conserving space or something? Please make it possible for us older folks to enlarge the font size of static webpage text, especially things like our personal prayer lists. I get eye strain every day just trying to read my own prayer list, and it discourages me from using Logos for that purpose.

Thank you for your consideration and bless you for all the work you do for us.

I understand how frustrating it can be when software doesn’t function the way you think it should. There’s a particular feature in Microsoft Office that drives me crazy every time I use it.

We want to hear from you regarding things you’d like to be able to do and things you wish were different. We can’t always implement them, and often we can’t implement them immediately (though occasionally we can), but we do want to hear them. You can use suggest@logos.com or our suggestion newsgroup to let your voice be heard. We’re listening.

What often happens, though, is that suggestions provide an opportunity to demonstrates features already in the software. Such is the case with this request, at least for the most part. It is possible to change the font size for prayer lists to make them more readable.

Here’s how:

  1. Open your prayer list by going to File > Open and selecting “Prayer Lists” and the particular prayer list you’d like to open.
  2. With the prayer list opened and selected, go to View > Zoom and select something like 150%, or larger if you’d like.

Your prayer list will go from this:

to this:

or even bigger.

If you’d like to make this change globally so that it applies to all of your resources, reports, and other documents, go to Tools > Options > General > Text Display and set your default zoom to whatever size you’d like. Make sure to uncheck the box “Use Default Zoom Only with Resources” if you’d like it to apply to things like your prayer lists.

The zoom allows you to make the font size as big as you’d like in order to make your reading—and praying—more comfortable.