How to Find That Missing Gem

Have you ever had trouble locating something that you previously read in one of your Libronix books? Perhaps it’s that perfect quote for the sermon or paper you’re working on—if only you could find it. If you don’t remember which book it was in, you can always check your history to see which books you’ve used recently. After you find the right book, you could then search or use the find bar to locate what you’re looking for—if you remember an exact word or phrase. But what if you remember only the general idea?

I’ve found that often the quickest way to find something in a situation like this is to use the Next button and select Markup.

I remember reading something in Strong’s Systematic Theology. I don’t recall exactly where it was or the precise wording, but I know I highlighted it. So I open Strong’s, switch the Next selection to Markup, click the button a few times, and I am quickly taken to the exact quote I was looking for. Of course, this works only if you are marking up your books when you read. If you’re not, I’d encourage you to do so, even if only for the benefit of using this cool feature. Keep in mind that if your book has hundreds of markups, you’ll at least need to remember the section or chapter to make this efficient. In my case, the quote I was looking for was in chapter two, so finding it was a breeze.

Another really handy use of the Next Markup feature is to get a quick survey of the parts of the book that stood out to you in your first reading. Try this with a chapter in a book, a large article entry, or a section in a commentary to get a quick recap of the most important points.

Give it a try. I think you’ll find it a convenient feature that will soon become a part of your normal use of Libronix.

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2 Responses to “How to Find That Missing Gem”

  1. Graham Billinghurst March 5, 2008 at 2:07 am #

    It’s a helpful feature. Certainly if a publication has many markups there will be difficulty narrowing down a search without identifying the section or chapter to help it’s efficiency.
    How much more helpful it would be to be able to narrow down the feature further by selecting which markup style one wanted the ‘next’ or ‘previous’ arrows to go to. Maybe a specific Precept Inductive Bible Study Markup style or one of the Part of Speech Colouring styles.

  2. Doyle W. Sims March 6, 2008 at 1:44 pm #

    This helps me quite often.