Lecture Series Event Recap

Logos marketing assistantMark VanDyke, who has been instrumental in promoting the Lecture Series, shares this retrospective.


This past Monday, Logos presented the first Lecture Series event to a standing-room only crowd at Bellingham’s Mount Baker Theatre.

More than 160 peopleturned out to hear featured lecturer Dr. Rod Stiling of Seattle Pacific University, who spoke on “Interpretations of the Genesis Flood Before and After Darwin”.
The lecture focused mostly on American geology during the scientific revolution, specifically as it related to Noah’s flood.

One of the highlights of the night was Dr. Stiling’s incorporation of art into his lecture – often referring to how painters in the late 19th century viewed the flood.

The lecture was followed by a stimulating question and answer session filled with pointed questions about the effects that science can have on one’s faith and how Christians should approach the Bible with some knowledge of empirical evidence for what they believe.

The feedback submitted after the lecture was overwhelmingly positive – which is particularly gratifying due to the diverse crowd that had gathered to hear Dr. Stiling speak.

The next three lectures in the series are already lined up, so be sure to visit the Lecture Series page for all the details!

March 26, 2007Is the Old Testament Historically Reliable? Dr. Phil Long, Regent College

April 14, 2007Exploring the New Myths of Science and Science FictionDr. James A. Herrick, Hope College

May 5, 2007The Psalms and Our Destiny: Understanding the Message of the Book of PsalmsDr. Mark Futato, Reformed Theological Seminary

Comments

  1. South Africa is only 24 hours traveling time away. Would love to come :-) …. but would prefer a mp3 file of the lectures. Is this not possible?

  2. I agree with our South African brother — I appreciate the Google map that shows me how to get to the Mount Baker Theater, but it’s a long way from the Mid-Western USA. Your lecture series topics sound very interesting, and I would hope for an mp3 link (or print article) as well.