Fresh Blog Posts, Delivered to Your Email Inbox

I realize I’m inviting criticism by offering another way to increase the amount of email you receive from Logos so close on the heels of my Sipping from a Firehose post…but here goes.

We recently added a way for you, the Logos Blog reader, to sign up to receive new blog posts directly to your email inbox.

Some will argue that this defeats the whole purpose of RSS feeds and they’re right. I also know that plenty of people enjoy reading the Logos Blog yet have no interest in learning how RSS feeds work even if it’s super simple. They mastered email a long time ago and it works just fine, thank you very much.

If you’re one of those people and you want the latest Logos Blog post to be delivered to your email inbox without you having to think about it…just use the simple sign-up mechanism in the right-hand column of the main Logos Blog page. It looks like this:




And once you’re all signed up, every time we post to the Logos Blog (more or less 5x per week), the content of the post will appear “automagically” in your inbox, looking something like this:


Interview with Bob Pritchett: The Early Years

Every culture tells stories about itself. Stories that give answers to the Big Questions: where did we come from, who are we, where are we going? Stories that inspire and motivate; stories that enslave and perpetuate harmful attitudes. Some would say that without shared stories there’s really no “we” to talk about.

Companies like Logos also tell culture-creating stories that define who we are and help delineate our collective purpose. But any period of rapid growth brings the attendant risk that the company’s culture will be lost, or at least lost on the new hires. This risk is especially acute when the new hires will be working thousands of miles away from the home office.

Sharing the Logos Story

Since we won’t be flying the new Field Sales team to Bellingham for every chili cookoff or field trip to the Dead Sea Scrolls—and it will be a little harder for Bob to take the new reps out for coffee—we’re recording stories from various Logos team members to share with the new hires. My guess is that some of these stories will be new for many of us who work right here in Bellingham, too.

We’d also like to share some of these stories with you, so I’ll be posting a series of video interviews over the coming weeks that help tell the Logos story.

Interview with Bob Pritchett

First up in the series is an interview with Bob Pritchett, Logos co-founder, president and CEO. We’ll “begin at the beginning” with Bob answering a question about how he first got into computers and Bible software. You’ll hear Bob describe what it was like to work with early electronic Bibles, how he swapped his first search engine for Bible texts, and more…

The interviewer is Scott Lindsey, director of ministry relations, and Dale Pritchett is behind the camera.

Note: All videos are in Windows Media format. Mac users may need to download the free Flip4Mac plugin for playback within QuickTime.

New sales jobs in eight cities!

Knocking On DoorI wish that we could show Logos Bible Software to every Bible student in the world. Because when people who are serious about getting into the Word see how Logos Bible Software enhances their study, they can’t wait to use it.

We try to show Logos in as many ways as we can. We put demo videos on the web, we present at conferences, and we even show it to seat-mates on airplanes. About the only thing we don’t do is go door-to-door.

But we’re ready to try that, too.

We are going to launch a national sales force of Field Representatives: full-time Logos employees who visit pastors and Bible students in eight large cities around the country, showing people how Logos Bible Software helps them do better, deeper Bible study while wasting less time finding things and flipping paper pages.

Are you a salesperson looking for a product you can sell without reservation? Please take a look at the job description, and please feel free to forward it to anyone you know who might be interested.

Our first openings will be in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Seattle, and Washington, DC.

Sipping from a Firehose

I love being a dad and one of my favorite moments every day is when I get home after work and my daughters, aged 2 and 4, run to the door with hugs and squeals of delight. Makes a guy feel like a hero.

It can also be a bit overwhelming, as the girls often try to outdo one another in relating the news of the day. There’s just so much to tell and all of it is highly important.

As we attempt to convey all the stuff that’s happening at Logos I sometimes feel like my daughters. We have so much to communicate and everything is important, at least to some slice of our constituents. Though we do try to keep the squealing to a minimum.

There’s certainly a risk ofinflicting information overload.But even with the blog, NewsWire, newsgroups, and alerts within Libronixwe often have to leave things unsaid.

A classic example: with the massive influx of new prepublication titles it’s easyto lose track ofwhat’s been added to the prepublication page. That means eager customers who pre-order a title may wait longer for the title to gain enough support to move into production. Many of these titles would go straight into production if we could just deliver the message to allthe interested people (without swamping everyone else).

Announcing…Special Interest Lists

The NewsWire email service will always remain the best way to stay current on the latest sales, specials, and new products from Logos. It’s for everyone and if you pay attention to nothing else from us, you should be sure to open NewsWire when it hits your inbox.

But now you canreceive additional announcements in areas of special interest. The four newemail lists described below will ensure that you’re hearing about the titles that are most important to you.

We also hope that opening up this new communication channel will prevent some of the more “niche” titles from getting lost in the shuffle, giving them an extra boost and moving them into production more directly.

The four new lists you can subscribe to are:

  • Greek Interest – News, product announcements, and updates for those who work with the Greek language.
  • Hebrew Interest – Ditto, but for Hebrew.
  • Other Ancient Languages Interest – Ditto, but for “other ancient languages” such as Aramaic, Latin, Syriac, Coptic, Ugaritic, Armenian, Georgian, Gothic, Ethiopic, Old Church Slavonic.
  • Academic Interest – This list is not related to the academic purchase program. It’s for people who have a strong interest in scholarly books that tend to interact heavily with the literature of biblical studies.For example, theLibrary of NT Studies: JSNTS on Paulor Barth’s Church Dogmatics.

We haven’t sent the first mailing to any of these lists yet, but you can sign up now and get in from the beginning. If you don’t find it to be useful, you can always unsubscribe later.

Hint: Be sure to follow all the steps below, as these are double opt-in lists.

Sign Up Now!

  1. Visit your My Subscriptions page at Logos.com to view and subscribe to available email lists. (You can always get there again later from My Account, linked at the top-right corner of the website.)
  2. Check the box next to each subscription you want to receive.
  3. Click the “Update Subscriptions” button at the bottom. Your computer will think for a few seconds as the server subscribes/unsubscribes you appropriately.
  4. Important:at this point, a Confirm button appears. You’re not subscribed until you click Confirm!(Note: The Macintosh Interest list requires separate confirmation.)
  5. Once you’ve confirmed your subscription(s), the My Subscriptions page will show a checkmark by each mailing you’ll receive. The list manager will send you another email letting you know you’re subscribed and confirmed.

Logos Expands Again

The last week of December saw another shuffle at our Bellingham offices. Hopefully it was all transparent to you, the customer, but about half of us moved our desks to a different location. The growing Design & Editorial department moved across the building, salespeople were all shuffled,and the entire support team moved from 1313 Commercial to a building two doors down the block (the space briefly occupied by Room2Think).

Why all the moves and why should you care? One word: growth.

Recent hiring and planned expansion for 2007 put us at max capacity. To continue to expand our operation, take on new data projects, launch new sales and marketing programs…we had to open up new space to put people.

If you’re a Logos customer, growth is good news.It means more new books, ground-breaking databases, innovative products, and continued excellence in service and support. 2006 was a record year and we look forward to what 2007 holds!

Keep in mind…if you or someone you know is bright, talented, passionate about the Bible, and looking for work…be sure tokeep an eye on our jobs page. Logos is a great place to work and Bellingham is a great place to live!

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More photos at the LogosBibleOffice Flickr page…

Introducing…The Logos Lecture Series

Today’s guest blogger is Mark VanDyke, who works in marketing at Logos.
Do you ever miss your college or seminary days, when you went from class to class hearing lectures on a seemingly endless array of topics?

Now we are sharing access to some of North America’s top scholars through a new community event called the Logos Bible Software Lecture Series.

These presentations will all be free and open to the public, and are designed to be interesting and accessible to a broad audience.

The inaugural Lecture Series event will feature widely acclaimed speaker, Dr. Peter Flint of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute at Trinity Western University. Dr. Flint’s lecture will focus on how the scrolls have affected modern biblical translation. The event will be held at Bellingham’s iconic Mount Baker Theatre at

7:00 PM on Wednesday, January 10.
We expect to host a lecture every couple of months and prospective topics range from ancient text analyses to cutting-edge technologies that can be applied to biblical studies.

One of the reasons we’re excited about the event is that we always look forward to meeting our customers. It gives us a chance to learn about our users’ interests and events like this also demonstrate our dedication at Logos for helping people understand the Bible in new and exciting ways.

We Love Your Suggestions

Developer David Mitchell examines screenshotsof Logos workspaces submitted by users.

Logos customers make lots of great suggestions. Suggestions for books to digitize, features to add or tweak, website enhancements, you name it.

Most suggestions come via email (suggest@logos.com) and a newsgroup devoted to user suggestions. But we also collect feedback when we’re on the road, from published reviews, beta testers, and blog readers.

Not all suggestions receive a response and sometimes a suggestion is implemented months or years after it was first submitted. But we appreciate every one.

And sometimes we’re able to implement them right away, as you can see from the comments on this post at the Morris Proctor Tips & Tricks blog. A user named David Brokaw suggested a small feature he’d like to see addedto the Bibliography report. He explained,

I keep all my reference books open in the right side and save my work space as I am working on a long paper. What I need is the Bibliography option to have a “All Open Resources” option that will automaticly collect the info open at the time. Great idea???

I agreed that it was a great idea. Mr. Brokaw’s suggestion was routed to our development team, and a few days later the feature was added to the Libronix DLS 3.0c release candidate.

Now you can create a bibliography report from the resources you have open. Sure it’s a small feature, and we can’t always implement good suggestions this quickly. But please know that we valueyour input…andkeep those suggestions coming!

The Case for an E-Library

The forthcoming issue of Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal includes an extensive (3,400+ word!) review of Scholar’s Library: Gold – Logos Bible Software 3. We received permission to post the review at Logos.com in advance of publication, so you can read the whole thing and even download the PDF.

Every reviewer puts a unique spin on his analysis. This reviewer, Andrew Naselli—who is at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School working on his second Ph.D.—does a great job of answering tough questions that a prospective buyer might ask before deciding to build an electronic library. These are questions Naselli struggled with before deciding to invest in Logos, so his responses are thoughtful and genuine.

  • Should I Buy E-Books From Only One or Multiple Software Companies?
  • Will New Technology Make Current E-Books Obsolete?
  • What if the Software Company Goes Out of Business?
  • Are E-Books Riskier Than Print Books?
  • How Is an E-Library Superior to a Print Library?
  • How does Scholar’s Library: Gold Compare to Other Products?

I’ll conclude with one of my favorite quotations from the review just to pique your interest. To the question of whether owning electronic books is “risky,” Naselli responds:

Some think that print books are safer investments than e-books. However, building any kind of library— whether print or electronic—involves some degree of risk. Print books are arguably a more risky investment than some e-books since print books are in danger of theft, natural disasters, and wear and tear from usage. A few years ago one pastor loaded up all of his earthly possessions, including his print library, into a moving truck, which was stolen the very next day. If that pastor had an e-library of Logos Bible Software, he would have received his entire e-library back for free.

Related posts:

Syntax Search Example: Hands, Heads and Feet as Subjects in the New Testament

Here’s a fun syntax search. For some reason I thought of searching the New Testament for places where body parts — hands, feet, heads, etc. — served as the subject of a clause.
You know, things like Mt 17.2:

And he was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became white as light.(Mt 17:2, ESV)

As seems to be my habit, I constructed the search and made a video of the process so I could share it with y’all. Enjoy!