Introducing…The Logos Lecture Series

Today’s guest blogger is Mark VanDyke, who works in marketing at Logos.
Do you ever miss your college or seminary days, when you went from class to class hearing lectures on a seemingly endless array of topics?

Now we are sharing access to some of North America’s top scholars through a new community event called the Logos Bible Software Lecture Series.

These presentations will all be free and open to the public, and are designed to be interesting and accessible to a broad audience.

The inaugural Lecture Series event will feature widely acclaimed speaker, Dr. Peter Flint of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute at Trinity Western University. Dr. Flint’s lecture will focus on how the scrolls have affected modern biblical translation. The event will be held at Bellingham’s iconic Mount Baker Theatre at

7:00 PM on Wednesday, January 10.
We expect to host a lecture every couple of months and prospective topics range from ancient text analyses to cutting-edge technologies that can be applied to biblical studies.

One of the reasons we’re excited about the event is that we always look forward to meeting our customers. It gives us a chance to learn about our users’ interests and events like this also demonstrate our dedication at Logos for helping people understand the Bible in new and exciting ways.

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13 Responses to “Introducing…The Logos Lecture Series”

  1. Colin Wright January 8, 2007 at 6:14 am #

    I assume these lectures will be uploaded as mp3 or video to enable those of us “far away” to enjoy! (for “far away” read Ireland!)

  2. G.Selter January 8, 2007 at 6:46 am #

    Is there a way, ie through e-mail that these lectures can be accessed by logos users like me who live in Europe?? I think that not only I but others will appreciate this very much.

  3. Mike Thomas January 8, 2007 at 7:03 am #

    It sure would be nice to have an audio podcast or even better a downloadable video of these lectures for those of us who live thousands of miles from Bellingham.

  4. Mike January 8, 2007 at 7:21 am #

    Any chance that the lecture audio will be available to download?

  5. Andrew Hughes January 8, 2007 at 9:16 am #

    Do you have plans to make video or audio of the Logos Bible Software Lecture Series available for those of us who do not live in the Bellingham area?

  6. Daniel Foster January 8, 2007 at 10:37 am #

    Sorry folks, we won’t be able to post streaming audio or video. But one of Dr. Flint’s books provides a good introduction to the topic:
    http://www.amazon.com/Meaning-Dead-Sea-Scrolls-Understanding/dp/0060684658/sr=1-3/qid=1168281121/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3/

  7. Sharad Yadav January 8, 2007 at 3:03 pm #

    Will you make them more broadly available in any form?

  8. Jeff January 8, 2007 at 5:25 pm #

    It is a pity that you won’t be able to post the slides and mp3 of the lecture — it seems that it would not be very difficult to arrange. But may I suggest that you set up a separate local blog for Bellingham area events, since the vast majority (likely in excess of 99%) of the readership of this blog would be unable to attend this lecture.

  9. Murray Woolnough January 9, 2007 at 7:28 am #

    Oh I’m really disappointed that a company that is about making things accessible to people won’t be making this accessible to 99% of your users.

  10. Les Preiss January 9, 2007 at 7:43 am #

    I too would like to add my voice to the suggestion that LOGOS and/or Libronix consider some sort of podcasting of these types of events. I would even consider a subscription that would require a small fee.

  11. Sharad Yadav January 9, 2007 at 10:39 am #

    I hope none of this comes across as ungrateful or whiney – it’s fantastic that you’ve made it free and open to the public. It’s just that i DO miss my college and seminary days, when I went from class to class hearing lectures on a seemingly endless array of topics.

  12. Paul Burgess January 9, 2007 at 9:27 pm #

    That’s a shame that you will not make the lectures available for podcast. The technicalities are minimal, the required technology is mininmal, and the impact extraordinary. So either don’t tell us about these things, or make them available, even if you want us to pay an amount like US$5 for download rights. I am sure many would gladly pay.

  13. Danny Hinton January 10, 2007 at 8:43 am #

    It is great that you are doing this series for the locals! For those of us not local,are there
    plans to include us in the future? “Sorry folks”
    doesn’t tell us much why you don’t want to be inclusive to the majority of your customers.