How Much Do You Want to Pay?

What if you could visit the website of your favorite publisher, browse a list of books that are candidates for publication, and put a bid on the ones you’d like to own? That’s right…tell the publisher which books you’d like to see published and how much you’d be willing to pay for each one.

Sound too good to be true? Truth is, this is the experience enjoyed by hundreds of Logos users who have discovered the Logos Community Pricing Program.

In a nutshell, the Community Pricing Program works like this: Logos posts a list of public domain titles, you browse the list, put a bid on any title that catches your eye, and sit back and wait for the book to get produced. Your bid is the top price you’re willing to pay, so there are never any unpleasant surprises!

That’s it…easy as pie.

Going Once, Going Twice…

I grew up in a rural part of northern Michigan (some would say “rural northern Michigan” is a redundancy) and loved to go to the Old MacDonald Auction Barn in the neighboring town of Pickford whenever I got the chance. When looking for a new couch recently, I discovered a monthly auction held at a warehouse here in Bellingham. This auction has a lot less farm equipment, but it’s still the fun experience I remembered…and an all-afternoon experience, which doesn’t work out real well for our two kids, aged 2 and 3-1/2.

But it turns out auction houses have anticipated the desire to bid on items in absentia. When nap time came around, we filled out a brief form with our bidder number and the top bid amount for each item we wanted to bid on. The auction house had a person to bid on our behalf and they’d call us the next day if we had the top bid for any item on our list. Absentee bidding lacks the thrill and energy of being there, but it is rather convenient!

If it helps, think of the Community Pricing Program as absentee bidding. You show up at the “auction” (in this case a webpage), take a look around, kick the tires, register your top bids for the stuff you want, and walk away. We’ll get in touch with you by email if your bid was successful. Even better, if your bid was too low we’ll shoot you an email to let you know before the “auction” closes…at which point you can choose to either raise your bid enough to get the book, or let it pass.

Oh, and did I mention that with Community Pricing you’re not bidding against the other bidders…you’re all working together! See, we love our customers so much that as more people bid for a book, the price goes lower! Yes, you read that right:

More bidders = lower prices for everyone!

Ready, Set, Bid!

If you’re ready to get started, jump over to the Community Pricing page to see all the titles currently available for bidding. The bright, red circles at the top of the page walk you through the 3 simple steps to get started.

What, you’re still reading this? Then here’s a preview of what you’ll find on the Community Pricing page: classic commentaries, works on the Life of Christ, Greek and Hebrew helps, a fascinating historical survey, and more. Authors whose names you may recognize include Ironside, Barnes, Alford, Deissmann, Schürer, and Driver.

And if you need any more incentive to get started right now, check this: three items on the Community Pricing page are very close to having enough bids to end the “auction” on those items and move them into production. Now is the time to tell us how much you want to pay for these great additions to your digital library!

Comments

  1. Have you made it where I can call my Logos Sales Rep & bid through him yet? I’d love to bid on books by calling in my bid to Logos Sales.
    Thanks!
    Nathan

  2. I love community pricing. You can save major bucks. But why would you want to call a sales rep to do community pricing, when it is more cost effective for logos and easier for you to just do it with a simple click of the mouse?

  3. Good idea. Never thought of community pricing as an auction. Now just maybe some of those books will go over the top, and more people will join in and the prices will continue to fall.
    The more bidders the lower the prices, the faster we get the books, the more money Logos makes, and the process starts all over again.
    Everyone’s a winner.
    You could not beat that with a stick.