Of the Making of Books (Part 4)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)
Galaxie Software

Back in 1999, Galaxie Software approached us about using our technology for a very interesting project. They had been electronically publishing back issues of a number of theological journals (Bibliotheca Sacra from Dallas Theological Seminary, Grace Theological Journal and several others) using a different technology platform. In May of 1999, they released Version 3 of their Theological Journal Library utilizing our technology. Version 3 contained a total of 150 years of various journals. By March of 2002, they were up to 250 years of journals in their Version 5 release.

Galaxie has continued to expand the list of included journals and now has 400 years of journals in their collections. The first 250 are still sold as a collection, now designated as Volumes 1-5. Subsequent additions have been released in 50-year collections and are sold separately as Volume 6, Volume 7 and Volume 8), which was just released in September of 2005.

The journals have proven to be one of the most appreciated additions to the Libronix DLS family. Beyond the spectacular savings in cost and space to have 400 years worth of journals at your fingertips, a large percentage of these back issues are only available in select seminary libraries, not readily accessible to most of our customers.

Galaxie has produced a number of other products using our technology, including Dan Wallace’s Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics.

Galaxie is also a partner with the Biblical Studies Foundation in producing electronic editions of the NET Bible.

Comments

  1. Philip Gons says:

    Is it true that Logos no longer allows companies like Galaxie Software to self-publish in Libronix format, unless the company has already been doing so for some time? Someone recently told me that. I’m curious if this is true, and if so, why? It would seem that the more companies that can be enticed to choose Libronix to self-publish in over some other software platform, the better! Thanks.