Knox Doctor of Ministry: A Degree for Ministers

give your ministry momentum knox

As a minister of the Word, you have a high calling. The work of biblical ministry requires the minister to be able to draw from the entirety of Scripture to benefit and enrich the church body:

“All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness”
—2 Timothy 3:16

That’s why Knox Theological Seminary is committed to equipping pastors in biblical preaching and teaching. With a Knox DMin, you’ll learn the exegetical and homiletical skills you need to preach Christ from all of Scripture.

A DMin from Knox is affordable and flexible. You’ll do much of your course work wherever you are, so you can keep your job and continue your ministry where God has you. You can complete up to three DMin courses online; in addition, a couple of times each year, you’ll fly in for Knox’s one-week intensives, where you’ll study with world-class professors like Bryan Chapell, Gerald Bray, Michael Allen, Jim Belcher, and others.

“I just returned home from two very fruitful weeks at Knox in the DMin program. I am eager to get back into the classroom. This is an excellent program and the Logos connection makes it very affordable. Thank you Knox and Logos.”
—Jim, a Knox DMin student

This May and June, you can take some incredible classes, including:

  • DM872: The Epistle to the Hebrews: Exegesis and Theology (online), with Dr. Michael Allen
  • DM836: The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching, with Dr. Warren Gage
  • DM856: Mission and Tradition: Seeking Balance in Ministry, with Dr. Jim Belcher
  • DM916: Scripture and Doctrine, with Dr. Jonathan Linebaugh

Now’s a great time to start earning your doctorate—request more information about a Knox DMin, and start futhering your ministry today!

Learn more about Knox’s DMin program.

Explore the Language of the Early Church

HarpersLatinDictionaryWe pay a lot of attention to the Bible’s original Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic, but many of the early church’s most important texts were written in another language: Latin. Luckily, Logos offers some outstanding Latin reference works and primary sources that can bring you closer to the ancient world.

Let’s start exploring:

Get the best Latin dictionary

Choosing scholarly resources can come down to preference—we all have our favorite authors, our favorite exegetical methods, our favorite reference works. But sometimes there’s no room for debate: sometimes one resource is clearly the standard in its field.

Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary is that resource. For those of us who’re fascinated by the ancient world, it’s simply the finest Latin dictionary available.

Scholars choose Lewis and Short because of its breadth. It gives you 2,019 pages’ worth of lexical data, spanning classical times through the early modern era; that makes it an important aid whether you’re working through Irenaeus or through Aquinas. If you’re studying Christian history, you’ll be working with Latin. If you’re working with Latin, you’ll want this dictionary.

Moreover, it’s in the Logos edition that Lewis and Short really shines. Those 2,019 pages can be hard to navigate in print, to say nothing of the legwork involved in cross-referencing them against the patristic hard copies (if you can even access any). With Logos, everything is indexed for precise searches, and you can jump right from an entry to a primary source and vice versa. It’s that mixture of scholarly rigor and right-now usefulness that’s earned Lewis and Short such glowing reviews: other Logos users write that “[t]his is THE Latin dictionary,” that it’s “easily the best Latin dictionary ever made,” that it’s “stellar,” that “no hard copy can even begin to compete with what we can do with a Logos dictionary.”

Navigate the early church’s culture with the finest Latin dictionary available: pick up Lewis and Short right now.

Then choose from these important primary sources:

early-church-fathers-protestant-edition1. Early Church Fathers

Augustine, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Eusebius, Origen—this massive collection sets you up with English translations of the postapostolic era’s most important works. It’s a window into the origins of a great deal of Christian doctrine, which makes it a fascinating way to revisit the foundations of your faith. Pick up the Early Church Fathers collection and explore the early church’s world.

2. The Works of Prudentius

The poems of Prudentius, who was educated in religion, literature, and rhetoric, are shot through with biblical influence. His most important work is the Psychomachia, which is considered the first major Christian allegory; that means it paved the way for classics like the Divine Comedy and The Pilgrim’s Progress. You’re already studying the early church’s theologians. Now, while the four-volume Works of Prudentius is on Community Pricing, you can study its poetry for 73% off.

works-of-ovid-and-horace3. Works of Ovid and Horace

Latin literature’s three canonical poets are Virgil, Ovid, and Horace. Though they weren’t Christian writers, it’s important to know their work, which was hugely influential in the ancient world. You can get Virgil’s Aeneid in the famous Harvard Classics Collection; Ovid and Horace you can get in the incredibly rich Works of Ovid and Horace. (The standout volume is Ovid’s Metamorphoses, one of the most influential poems in literary history.) Get in on the best price—bid on Ovid’s and Horace’s collected works for 83% off!

4. Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things

In Acts 17:18, Paul addresses Epicurean and Stoic philosophers. If you’re curious about Paul’s context, you’ll want to look into Epicureanism, one of the most popular worldviews in early Christian times; the best way to do so is through the writings of Lucretius. (Epicurus’ magnum opus, On Nature, was destroyed, but Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things builds on Epicurus’ thought.) Right now, On the Nature of Things is 72% off on Community Pricing—place your bid before the price goes up.

Pick up Lewis and Short today, and then choose the primary sources that fit your study!

Why Scriptural Metacomments Matter

lexham-discourse-hebrew-bible-bundleHave you ever noticed that when we talk, instead of just saying what we want to say, we’ll often say something about what we’re saying? We use expressions like:

  • “I want you to know that . . .”
  • “It’s very important that you understand that . . .”
  • “Don’t you know that . . .”

Expressions like these are called metacomments.  They interrupt the speech by commenting on what’s about to be said, or what’s just been said. We could just as easily leave them out and say what we wanted to say—so why do we use them?

The interruption caused by the metacomment slows down the flow of the discourse, producing a special highlighting effect. Just think about when we use the English expressions listed above. They signal that what we are about to say is important information. Think of them as road flares or speed bumps, telling you to pay attention to what is just ahead.

Believe it or not, metacomments are also used in Scripture. The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and the English High Definition Old Testament use symbols to mark each metacomment.

Metacomments in action

Let’s take a closer look at a metacomment:

In 1 Kings 2:36–38, King Solomon, adhering to his father David’s final instructions (vv. 2–9), commands that Shimei the Benjaminite be confined to Jerusalem in order to prevent him from marshaling support against the Davidic dynasty. In v. 37, Solomon threatens Shimei with what will happen to him if he attempts to cross the Wadi Kidron and leave Jerusalem:

metacomments

Click image to enlarge

Notice that the writer could have just said: “. . . on the day you go out and cross over the Wadi Kidron, you will surely die. Your blood will be on your head.”  But instead, the author inserts the metacomment: “know for certain that . . .” just before he states the consequence. This has the effect of slowing down the discourse and simultaneously highlighting the severity of the consequences Shimei will face if he tries to flee Jerusalem.

Another example of a metacomment involves the Hebrew phrase yn:∞doa} µ~aun “declares the Lord.” This formula is frequently used in the Prophets to break what might have been one long speech into smaller parts since the original manuscripts lacked chapter and verse divisions. Breaking it into smaller chunks makes it easier for the reader to process. But sometimes we find metacomments like “declares the Lord” used in unexpected places, like the middle of a clause or speech rather than the beginning or end. Placing the metacomment in the middle of the clause interrupts the flow of speech and highlights what comes next. Take a look at the use of yn:∞doa} µ~aun “declares the Lord” in Amos 8.

Amos 8 depicts the Lord’s impending judgment upon Israel. In v. 9, we read:

“And on that day,” declares the Lord GOD, “I will make the sun go down at noon and darken the earth in broad daylight.”

The metacomment “declares the Lord” is unnecessary, since we already know from v. 7 that Yahweh is the one speaking. Inserting this phrase in the middle of the clause interrupts the flow of speech, slowing down the discourse and signaling us to pay special attention to the imagery of divine judgment that follows.

Annotate each metacomment with the LDHB and LHDOT

The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and the Lexham High Definition Old Testament help you dig deeper in your Bible study by annotating each metacomment, as well as 29 other important discourse devices. These resources also include an introduction and glossary to help you understand the function of each device.

Last year we released Genesis–Jeremiah, and now we’re excited to announce the release of Ezekiel–Malachi. When you purchase the LDHB or the LHDOT, you’ll receive Genesis–Malachi; the remaining books will be automatically downloaded to your Logos library as they’re released in the coming months.

If you own either of these resources, you should have already received your update automatically. If you haven’t received your update yet, simply restart your software.

If you don’t already own the Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and the Lexham High Definition Old Testament, pick them up today!

Journey through Holy Week with Logos

He is Risen Holy WeekYesterday, Palm Sunday, marked the beginning of Holy Week. Now we walk through a season of sorrow, hope, and great joy.

Holy Week is a time to remember Jesus’ amazing victory over death. It’s a distinct and important time for Christians to reflect on and celebrate the resurrection of Jesus: a reminder of the greatest sacrifice and the most amazing redemption.

To help you reflect during this important time, we’ve discounted a number of valuable resources focusing on the Cross and the Resurrection.

This week, use coupon code EASTER2014 to save on powerful books:

Then tune in to LogosTalk all week long to enjoy devotional posts focused on this important season.

Torrey, UBS, and Biblical Apologetics—Newly Updated!

UBSHandbookSeries-OldTestament&Apocrypha-01We’re constantly improving Logos.com to make it easier to find your favorite authors and series. We just expanded three important Logos collections—are your editions up to date? Find out: visit the product page, log in to your account, and check out your custom price!

1. UBS Handbook New and Old Testament Series (55 vols.)

The UBS Handbook Series is a highly respected scholarly series that gives pastors, students, and Bible-lovers of all kinds a valuable exegetical, historical, and cultural look at the Old and New Testaments and the OT Apocrypha. Now updated to include 1 & 2 Kings, Ezra, Nehemiah, and several deuterocanonical books, the UBS Handbook Series equips you for exegesis.

2. Works of R.A. Torrey Collection (26 vols.)

Explore more of R.A. Torrey than you ever knew. This expanded collection includes his sermons, his important four-volume Fundamentals, his works on the Christian life, the Holy Spirit, and prayer, and his highly recommended apologetic works. Already own some of these books? Visit the product page to see your personalized price—the volumes you own have already been accounted for.

Use coupon code TORREY15 to save 15% when you complete the set! Act soon—this coupon code expires next Friday!

the-journal-of-biblical-apologetics3. Journal of Biblical Apologetics (11 vols.)

The Journal of Biblical Apologetics series provides accessible approaches to apologetics from an evangelical perspective, tying theological ideas back to their biblical roots and weighing nonbiblical ideas against biblical truth. Explore Islam, natural theology, Catholicism, and more in this engaging and recently compiled collection.

If you’re on a budget, you don’t have to pay all at once—set up an interest-free payment plan and start enjoying these books today.

Update your collections right now!

God, Jesus, and Judaism: An Old Testament Bridge to Faith

Michael HeiserJudaism and Christianity disagree in a number of ways. The most fundamental impasse is obviously Jesus. Christians embrace Jesus as the God of Israel incarnate, the messiah who came to earth to offer himself as an atoning sacrifice for the sins of humanity. One can find a spectrum of opinions about Jesus within Judaism, but not that one. For a Jew serious about their faith, accepting Jesus as God feels polytheistic—like a violation of the creed of Judaism in the Shema: “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one” (Deut. 6:4; JPS Tanakh). You can’t have more than one God in heaven.

It wasn’t always that way in Judaism.

The Jewish Godhead

Twenty-five years ago, rabbinical scholar Alan Segal produced what is still the major work on the idea of two powers in heaven in Jewish thought. Segal demonstrated that the two-powers idea was not deemed heretical in Jewish theology until the second century CE. He carefully traced the roots of the teaching back into the Second Temple (“Intertestamental”) era (ca. 200 BCE). Segal was able to establish that the idea’s antecedents were in the Hebrew Bible. Several passages became subjects of rabbinic discussion. For example, is there anything that strikes you as odd in Gen. 19:24?

“Then the Lord rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the Lord out of heaven.”

If you noticed that the divine name (Yahweh)—translated “Lord”—occurs twice, creating the impression of two divine actors, you saw what many Jewish thinkers saw in ancient times. The Hebrew Bible contains similar passages, in which the Lord is speaking and then refers to God in the third person (e.g., Amos 4:11).

Other passages became core focus points in the idea of two powers in heaven. Exodus 15:3 describes Yahweh as a “man of war.” That phrase might take our minds back to the captain of Yahweh’s host whom Joshua encountered (Josh. 5:13–15). Jews were certainly aware of that passage, but rabbis instead tied it to Exod. 23:20–23. In that text, God sends an angel to lead the people into the Promised Land. This angel was unique among all others not only because he could forgive sins (or not), but because God’s “name” was in him. The “name” is a Hebrew expression used as a substitute reference for God himself—his very presence or essence (e.g., Isa. 30:27–28). Even today, conservative Jews who will not say the divine name use ha-Shem (“the name”) to refer to God.

The idea of God in human form made Dan. 7:9–13 crucially important. In this famous vision scene, the Ancient of Days (God) sees “a human one” (“son of man”) coming to him with the clouds. It is to this figure that God gives everlasting dominion. This is the passage Jesus quotes to Caiaphas when the high priest demands to know who he is. Caiaphas’ reaction tells us immediately that he knew Jesus was claiming to be the God of Israel in human form—the second power. Caiaphas tears his clothes and charges Jesus with blasphemy (Matt. 26:63–68).

Early Judaism understood this portrayal and its rationale. There was no sense of a violation of monotheism, since either figure was indeed Yahweh. There was no second distinct god running the affairs of the cosmos. During the Second Temple period, Jewish theologians and writers speculated on an identity for the second Yahweh. Guesses ranged from divinized humans from the stories of the Hebrew Bible to exalted angels. These speculations were not considered unorthodox. That acceptance changed when certain Jews, the early Christians, connected Jesus with this orthodox Jewish idea. This explains why these Jews, the first converts to following Jesus the Christ, could simultaneously worship the God of Israel and Jesus, and yet refuse to acknowledge any other god. Jesus was the incarnate second Yahweh, the second power in heaven.

logos-mobile-education-ot291-the-jewish-trinity-how-the-old-testament-reveals-the-christian-godheadLogos Mobile Ed: The Jewish Trinity

My Jewish Trinity course for Logos Mobile Education takes students through the Old Testament basis for the Godhead and Judaism’s two-powers idea. Once the verses and motifs for the second power become clear, I also introduce students to how the same ideas get applied to the Holy Spirit. The Trinitarian teaching of the New Testament was not new to the Jewish apostles who lived with Jesus and inherited his message. They, along with Paul, knew the Old Testament well. How they write about Jesus and the Spirit reveals deliberate connections to teachings familiar to Jews.

Jewish Trinity is therefore an ideal course for conversations with Jewish friends and Jewish evangelism. It’s also a powerful resource for learning to deal with the doctrinal error of denying the deity of Jesus, perpetuated by groups like Jehovah’s witnesses and even “oneness” movements within Christianity.

Pre-order the Jewish Trinity course today for 40% off!

9 Pre-Pub Deals You Don’t Want to Miss

Pre-Pub lets you take advantage of extra-low prices by pre-ordering books before they’re produced: the sooner you pre-order, the more you save. Once the book is produced, though, regular pricing kicks in. Right now, you can get your hands on a ton of Pre-Pub deals—don’t let these savings slip through your fingers!

Here are nine Pre-Pubs you don’t want to miss:

crossway-john-piper-collection-upgrade-21. Crossway John Piper Collection, Upgrade 2

Regularly $179.95
Pre-order it for $139.95—that’s 22% off (deal ends in three days!)

John Piper, chancellor of Bethlehem College and Seminary and founder of Desiring God Ministries, has written more than 50 books. Whether you’re trying to grasp timely and difficult theological questions, understand specific biblical passages, or live more faithfully, this profound collection has something for you.

2. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works, vol. 14: Theological Education at Finkenwalde

Regularly $59.95
Pre-order it for $39.95—that’s 33% off (deal ends in three days!)

For two years, Dietrich Bonhoeffer directed a small, illegal seminary—Finkenwalde—in Nazi Germany. Despite fierce opposition, Bonhoeffer remained dedicated to preparing young seminarians for the turbulence of parish ministry. Bonhoeffer’s two years at Finkenwalde produced some of his most significant theological work, and now you can learn from it in Logos.

solid-foundation-sermon-starters3. Solid Foundation Sermon Starters

Regularly $49.95
Pre-order it for $39.95—that’s 20% off (deal ends in three days!)

Sermon prep is a lot of work. Solid Foundation Sermon Starters helps you do it faster by taking care of the groundwork for you. The collection offers 294 distinct sermon blueprints, which break up essential books, figures, and biblical themes into sermon-sized texts, fully stocked with a key message, main sermon points, and illustrations. Each sermon starter is flexible, so you can build your sermons around the needs of your congregation.

4. Baker Encountering the Bible Upgrade

Regularly $67.99
Pre-order it for $50.95—that’s 25% off (deal ends in five days!)

To help Bible students jump into modern biblical scholarship, the Baker Encountering the Bible collection provides clear objectives and detailed chapter-by-chapter outlines, study questions, and focus boxes to home in on key topics. Designed for classroom use, these three texts engage Genesis, Isaiah, and Hebrews with the expertise of renowned biblical scholars in down-to-earth presentations.

select-works-of-raymond-e-brown5. Select Works of Raymond E. Brown

Regularly $52.95
Pre-order it for $39.95 (deal ends in seven days!)

Controversial in some Catholic circles and celebrated in others, Raymond E. Brown remains an important figure in the Catholic Church and the landscape of twentieth-century biblical scholarship. He was among the first Roman Catholic scholars to analyze the Bible using the historical-critical methodology. In these four volumes, Brown expresses his perspective on biblical exegesis, important archaeological finds, and church doctrine, and reflects on the roles of priests and bishops.

6. Select Works of Simon J. Kistemaker47% off! (Deal ends in 10 days)
7. Classic Studies on Persecution in Early Christianity30% off! (Deal ends in 17 days)
8. J.N.D. Kelly’s Early Christian Doctrines and Creeds33% off! (Deal ends in 20 days)
9. Select Studies in Martin Luther’s Life and Influence25% off! (Deal ends in May)

These aren’t all the deals that are ending soon. Browse them all, and then snag the best deals on the books you love. See what else is shipping soon!

I Dare You Not to Bore Me with the Bible

I-Dare-You_Cover_200x300The Bible is filled with passages so baffling we tend to ignore them. Yet the passages that seem the weirdest might be some of the most important.

For the past six years, Michael S. Heiser has been unveiling these passages’ ancient context in his articles for Bible Study Magazine. Now you can read these articles in the newly available essay collection I Dare You Not to Bore Me with the Bible.

Explore the meaning of passages like Zipporah’s circumcision of Moses, Jephthah’s tragic vow in the book of Judges, and the warring sea monsters in Psalm 74. Connect yourself to the time during which the biblical writers lived and wrote with articles on worldview, like “The Ancient’s Guide to the Galaxy.”

Get answers to the Bible’s most perplexing questions

You’ll get help on some of the Bible’s most interesting topics:

  • “What Walking on Water Really Means”
  • “Born Again . . . and Again and Again?”
  • “Dumbledore Meets Philip & Peter”
  • “Paul’s Lost Letters”
  • “The New Testament Misquotes the Old Testament?”
  • “666: What Theories Add Up?”
  • And many more

The book will help you study the Bible in a whole new way—and it’ll ensure that you never skip a Bible passage again.

Get this essay collection while it’s still discounted at $4.95: pre-order yours today!

Get a Better Understanding of the Ancient World for Just $7

Hediod CollectionWe tend to think of ancient Greece (and the ancient world generally) as belonging to a single period: antiquity. The closer we look, though, the less antiquity looks like one internally consistent era—in fact, ancient Greece had its own internal rupture between ancient and modern. Between the two are the fascinating works of Homer and Hesiod.

The Greeks’ own Greek classics

By the time Aristotle composed his first arguments against Plato, the works of Homer and Hesiod were already hundreds of years old and venerated as classics. Most modern historians place Homer between 800 and 700 BC; Hesiod was active between 750 and 650 BC. (For reference, that puts us squarely in OT times: around then, Isaiah would have been carrying out his ministry in Judah.) Homer you know from his epics the Iliad and the Odyssey; Hesiod you know from the story of Pandora’s Box, which was actually a jar. The Greeks thought of Homer and Hesiod as a pair: the former gave the culture its great shared narratives, and the latter filled in the details—Hesiod described Greek mythology, farming, economics, astronomy, time-keeping, and more. Generally, his poems are didactic: they told the ancient Greeks how to live. Between Homer’s myth-building and Hesiod’s instructional goals (not to mention his exacting detail), these poems give us a remarkable window into ancient Greece.

A vexed relationship with the past

One of the things that make Homer and Hesiod so interesting is how they negotiated their own sense of ancient and modern. Bertrand Russell writes, “The Olympian gods, who represent religion in Homer, were not the only objects of worship among the Greeks, either in his time or later. There were other darker and more savage elements in popular religion, which were kept at bay by the Greek intellect at its best.” H.J. Rose describes these elements in his Primitive Culture in Ancient Greece: there were statues of Pan, which were beaten when food was scarce; there was a cave favored by the wolf-Zeus, in which no one cast a shadow and after entering which no one survived longer than a year; there was a clan of possible werewolves. We associate ancient Greece with pure reason, but all of this was still going on in classical times.

Russell argues that “The Homeric poems, like the courtly romances of the later Middle Ages, represent the point of view of a civilized aristocracy, which ignores as plebeian various superstitions that are still rampant among the populace. . . . Guided by anthropology, modern writers have come to the conclusion that Homer, so far from being primitive, was an expurgator . . . holding up an upper-class ideal of urban enlightenment.” That is, Homer’s works aren’t just a window into ancient Greece—they were a biased, active hand in shaping its religious customs.

We see a converse phenomenon in Hesiod, and this time the primitive customs are the Olympian myths themselves. Hesiod’s Theogony lays out Greek belief point by point, from the creation of the universe through the gods’ rise to power. The interesting part, though, isn’t what he writes—it’s how he was read. Even as the Greeks began to turn away from this mythology and seek purely rational explanations for the world, they continued to read Hesiod out of a sense of tradition: out of respect for antiquity.

It’s easy to think of the ancients as credulous, grasping at the nearest magical explanation for the phenomena around them. What we see in Homer and Hesiod, though, is a self-aware tension between past and present—one that feels very modern. Homer distances himself from ancient pagan belief to advocate for the Olympian pantheon. Hesiod fleshes out that Olympian pantheon but is, as the times change, relegated to a mere emeritus role. In many ways, the relationship of ancient Greece to its own antiquity looks like the relationship of modernity to ancient Greece. That’s what makes Homer and Hesiod so interesting: they represent not only timeless literature, but also an influential culture navigating its past and present.

* * *

Get 61% off Hesiod, the Homeric hymns, and the Homerica

You know how important ancient Greece is—it gave us mathematics, history, philosophy, and more. (In turn, Platonism contributed to the Christianity of the early Church Fathers and, in particular, helped bring about Augustine’s conversion and some of his most interesting thought.) If you’re interested in ancient history and biblical context, ancient Greece should be part of your study.

You also know how important the Iliad and the Odyssey are: if you don’t own these masterpieces, stop reading this post, add them to your Logos library, and start enjoying them today.

But Homer’s lesser-known works—the hymns and Homerica—and Hesiod’s writings give you an especially nuanced window into ancient Greek culture. Now Noet is building these classic texts in tagged, research-friendly editions that sync with the rest of your library and give you access to Logos’ powerful study tools. Currently, Noet’s two-volume Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica is just $7 on Community Pricing­—that’s 61% off!

Once you’ve added these important texts, you can get the big picture with one of Noet’s research libraries: the Classical Greek Bundle gives you the Iliad, Homeric GrammarLiddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon (LSJ), and more; better yet, the complete Classical Foundations Bundle gives you everything in the Classical Greek Bundle, plus essential works of philosophy, additional original-language resources, the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection, and far more.

Bid on Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica for just $7, and then pick the Noet library that’s right for you!

Spring into Scripture with Bible Study Magazine

BSM may juneSpring is a great time to dig into Scripture—and Bible Study Magazine is here to help.

Maybe you haven’t kept up with a New Year’s resolution to spend more time in the Word. Maybe you’ve been meaning to study more, but waiting for life to get less busy. You have the desire—and the ability—to know the Bible better, but you just can’t find the time. So what if you seized the opportunities you do have and started your day with spiritually rich, biblically insightful articles? You can do exactly that with a subscription to Bible Study Magazine. One BSM subscriber says, “I read these cover to cover. Outstanding information and inspiration.”

For only $19.95, you can have a year’s worth of insightful issues delivered right to your door. Here’s a peek at our May–June issue, featuring Kevin DeYoung:

  • “A Synagogue from Jesus’ Time” uses evidence from the recent archaeological find at Magdala to challenge our preconceived notions about synagogues. A unique infographic demonstrates how the synagogue’s structure and features shape our understanding of Gospel accounts.
  • Dr. Riad Kassis talks about advancing the Gospel in Lebanon and beyond with theological training that interprets Scripture in light of its context.
  • “4 Gospels, 4 Perspectives” emphasizes the distinct narrative approaches, literary techniques, and individual concerns of each Gospel writer. A helpful infographic complements the article, so you can keep track of the distinctions.

Bible Study Magazine is a great way to learn, grow, and get into the Word. If you want to fill your spring with spiritual wisdom, look no further. Subscribe today for just $19.95—that’s over 30% off the cover price!

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