Get Answers to Tough Questions with the Lexham Bible Guides

lexham-bible-guide-genesis-1-11Darren Aronofsky’s film Noah has created quite the stir. Regardless of whether we agree with his portrayal of Noah, we must admit he does raise some interesting questions about this important biblical account. After seeing the movie, I left the theater wanting to know more—wanting to find answers to these tough questions. I’m sure others did, too. But where can we find all the best scholarship and interpretations collected in one place? The Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 1–11 is our answer.

Let’s take a look at how the Lexham Bible Guides can help us find some answers to these controversial issues.

The nephilim

In the film, Aronofsky includes a giant clan that helps Noah build the ark; he calls them “the watchers”—conflating several traditions from the ancient world and later literature (and perhaps adding his own spin). Let’s see what the biblical text and other significant literature have to say about Genesis 6:1–4:

The dominant view, held by Sarna, is that [the nephilim] are the offspring of the union between the sons of God and the daughters of humankind, and thus are also the “mighty men” or “heroes” (gibborim) of Gen 6:4. This interpretation finds support in the Septuagint, which translates the word nephilim as “giants.”

This section from the Lexham Bible Guide also lists a number of other perspectives and where you can find them:

Nephilim

The Lexham Bible Guides list all the major interpretations of critical issues, so you can compare and contrast each viewpoint and come to your own conclusions.

Ancient Near Eastern flood stories

As you’re digging deeper into the biblical flood account, you might discover that it has parallels in other ancient cultures. Aronofsky could be pointing to these other stories by setting his film outside any recognizable period in history. The Lexham Bible Guide includes sections that dig into the flood story’s historical and cultural background:

Ancient Flood Stories - updated

These are just two examples of how the Lexham Bible Guides can serve as the ultimate resource as you seek answers to the tough questions raised in the Bible. We’ve done all the research for you. Begin your search now, while the questions are fresh in mind.

With the Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 1–11 or the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, you can take your research to new depths—and save time in the process. Order yours today!

Save on These 3 Valuable Counseling Resources

dan-b-allender-counseling-collectionIt’s part of life: whether you’re a licensed counselor or a compassionate friend, people are going to come to you for advice. When they do, it’s important that you be ready with counseling that’s both helpful and biblical.

Why walk that road alone? Some of the world’s most respected, experienced counselors have put together resources to help you.

Right now, you can save on:

1. The Dan B. Allender Counseling Collection

In a society where masking one’s emotions is the norm, it’s difficult to come to grips with the reality of deep spiritual suffering. Here, author and psychologist Dan B. Allender gives his unique perspectives on emotions, love, and childhood sexual abuse, and presents biblical ways to address these topics.

Filled with practical helps and biblical encouragement, the three-volume Dan B. Allender Counseling Collection will equip you to grasp the hope and freedom found in Christ.

Get it today for 25% off!

bh-marriage-and-family-collection2. B&H Marriage and Family Collection

Today’s most pressing marriage and family issues require advice from Christian pastors and counselors. That’s why the 19-volume B&H Marriage and Family Collection is ideal for pastors, teachers, parents, and anyone else seeking advice for restoring and maintaining healthy relationships. It’ll help your marriage and family not merely survive, but flourish.

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3. Caring for People God’s Way

Caring for People God’s Way presents Christian counseling in a systematic, step-by-step manner, and then applies that process to the most common issues faced by Christian counselors. You’ll learn to address stress and anxiety, trauma, perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder, grief, loss, anger, suicide, personality disorders, gambling, sexual addictions, and more.

Get it today for 10% off!

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These aren’t all the products on sale this month—check out the rest of our April Sale resources.

Get 50% Off Baker Books with Twitter #DailyDeals!

Every day, we offer a Twitter #DailyDeal: a limited-time offer for 50% off one of our products. This week, we’re partnering with Baker Publishing to offer 50% off five powerful study resources!

Today’s #DailyDeal is the Handbook on the Historical Books, which Eugene H. Merrill (professor of Old Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary) calls “an important addition to the literature on the Old Testament historical books.” Use coupon code 22862 today to get it for 50% off.

Here’s how to make sure you don’t miss a deal:

  1. Follow us on Twitter @Logos.
  2. Each day, look for the DailyDeal hashtag (#) for a new special offer.
  3. Click the tweet’s hyperlink, and use the provided coupon code to get 50% off!

See a deal your friends might like? Share it with them by clicking “retweet” on each deal this week.

Follow us on Twitter, and save 50% this week on Baker products!

Logos 5.2a: Updates to Library View

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Logos 5.2a recently came out. It introduces several changes, including enhancements to the View and Prioritize features.

The view icon has been replaced by a dropdown list with three options:

  • Cover displays a thumbnail preview of each resource.
  • Tile presents the resources in a simple list.
  • Details organizes the resources in a customizable spreadsheet.

1-View

The Library remains in “browse” mode; therefore, the Browse link has been removed, while the Prioritize (B) link toggles the Prefer these resources pane on and off, so you can easily designate your favorite resources (C).

2-Prioritize

You can see all the changes in 5.2a here.

If you haven’t downloaded this free update, just type update now in the Command box and press Enter!

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Haven’t upgraded to Logos 5 yet? You’re missing out! Get Logos 5 today.

The Resurrection Changes Everything

04-19_PsalmWe don’t like to talk about death. When we absolutely have to, we fall back on euphemisms like “passed on,” “no longer with us,” or “didn’t make it.” Left to our own devices, we’ll ignore it entirely.

The arts are more willing to engage the drama and inevitability of death; as a culture, we read novels and watch movies to try to make sense of it. On our own, though, we’re sociologically and psychologically unequipped to deal with death’s reality.

I’m convinced that we support huge cosmetology and plastic-surgery industries not only because of our worship of beauty, but because we fear aging as the harbinger of death. Not only do we want to elude death; we long to avoid the very things we associate with it. As Paul tells us in Romans 8, we, like all of creation, struggle to be liberated from our bondage to decay.

You do not give me up

David wrote many Psalms while under great duress, and one of my favorites is Psalm 16. Unlike many of David’s laments, this Psalm acknowledges his troubles in a grateful and almost casual manner.

“Therefore my heart is glad, and my soul rejoices;
my body also rests secure.
For you do not give me up to Sheol,
or let your faithful one see the Pit.”
Psalm 16:9–10

Within the context of Psalm 16, this is a powerful testimony of trust for someone under the constant threat of death. In light of Christ’s Resurrection, it becomes something else entirely . . .

When Peter addresses the gathered crowd at Pentecost, he calls this Psalm prophetic. More than just David trusting God to preserve his life, Psalm 16 becomes a prophecy of Christ’s defeat of death and his complete reset on what it means to be human.

The Resurrection changes everything

Psalm 16 was right—both contextually and prophetically. God delivered David from immediate threat, and Christ from the grave. We’re beneficiaries of both David’s confidence and Christ’s triumph, and through us all of creation benefits.

Death has been declawed and gagged. We ride in Christ’s train as his victory parade publicly shames the powers and authorities who sought to subject us to corruption and decay. The Resurrection is our hope, life, and victory.

In a culture that fears and shrinks away from death, we have a privilege and sacred responsibility to share our optimistic assurance that death doesn’t have the final answer. God is at work through the power of the Resurrection, redeeming the world to himself, and he will never willingly give us up to Sheol or let his faithful ones see the pit.

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Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

Good Friday: Sorrow and Hope

04-18_IsaiahAround the world, today is a day to remember God’s sacrifice.

Good Friday is also known as Holy Friday, or Great Friday. In Germany, this same day is often called Sorrowful Friday. These drastically different names capture not only important aspects of Good Friday’s purpose, but also the dual nature of the emotions surrounding this day.

It is good indeed

To some, Good Friday may seem to be an ironic name; what could be “good” about the day humanity murdered the deity that created it? But to Christians, Good Friday serves as a reminder not just of the death of Jesus, but of the hope we now have because of it. We don’t experience this day like the disciples and Jesus’ friends and family did, because we already know how it ends. What starts with death ends with life, salvation, and restoration. The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us, “because of Good Friday, we can thank God for Easter.”

Spoiler alert: evil loses

Sorrowful Friday is right, too. On this day, the only perfect human being ever to live was slain for our imperfections. This day was the epitome of sin in the world, and it’s a painful reminder of the evil that still dwells on this earth. It’s still here, waging war against God and his goodness.

We know that evil will lose, yet some days it feels as if evil has already won—as if the one we put our hope in didn’t conquer the way we expected. Some of the things people experience every day can feel like defeat: the loss of a loved one, crippling financial burden, heartbreak, or depression.

But remember:

“[H]e was wounded for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his stripes we are healed.”
—Isaiah 53:5

As Christians, we can have satisfaction and peace knowing that evil didn’t win. This is not the end. Easter is coming.

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Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

Why Phyllis Tickle Loves Our New Anglican Base Packages

Phyllis Tickle LogosPhyllis Tickle is one of the most interesting and important voices speaking to and for Christians today. A force in the Christian publishing world for nearly a quarter of a century, Phyllis has a lot to say about the trends of Christian belief and practice. Though she just celebrated her 80th birthday, Tickle’s analysis of new movements in Christianity continues to set the tone for current scholarship and reflection.

Tickle’s most recent work focuses on what she calls “Emergence Christianity.” Her two books on the subject—The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why and Emergence Christianity: What It Is, Where It Is Going, and Why It Matters—have quickly become seminal texts for anyone wanting to learn about this important movement.

Recently, I offered Phyllis Tickle, an Episcopalian, one of our Anglican base packages to review and endorse, if she felt so inclined. After using the package for a week or so, and asking me a number of questions to try to get at what we were doing and why, she had this to say:

Those of us who have already been using the Logos Bible packages and libraries for years are always going to be enthusiastic anytime Logos ventures into new territory or adds yet another base package. We are especially enthusiastic, of course, when that new addition plays directly into areas of our own particular interests, as is the case here; for as an Episcopalian, I fell into the Anglican base package like a child suddenly let loose in a carnival of impossible delights and unimagined wonders, not to mention of some totally fascinating and/or previously unsuspected esoterica.

An Anglican base package, like every other Logos package, is a tool, of course, not a carnival. It is designed as a tool and defined as one. Yet one of the major hallmarks of a good tool, one of the chief criteria for evaluating it, in fact, is to ask whether or not it delights, whether or not it sits comfortably in the hand, whether or not it gives both satisfaction to the eye and resolution to the tasks which it was created to address. This one does; and though it may not be properly represented as a carnival of delights (although I still contend it is that, too) the base package should most certainly be represented as a tool that can render the Anglican heart wiser in its affections and send the Anglican mind back to its daily work rejoicing.

The usefulness of the base packages for clergy,  academics, and licensed lay workers is almost too obvious to warrant comment (though it does bear saying that I cannot imagine anyone’s undertaking seminary training nowadays without having a base package duly tucked, quite literally, into his or her tool box.) Since I am neither professional clergy nor a practicing academic, however, and since, pray God, my days of graduate school are all well behind me, I can speak credibly only about the pleasure and the comfort and, perhaps, even the glory  of having, ready to hand at the click of a mouse, the primaries of Anglicanism . . . its great documents, its ecclesial proceedings and decisions, its political debates and theological arguments, etc. . . . as well as authoritative and respected commentaries on everything from our evolving theology over the centuries to our ever-evolving and shifting role in the political and secular life of the world.

A base package may not be for everyone . . . in fact, I doubt that it is . . . but for professionals and also for all of us who yearn toward more intimacy with who and what we are and more familiarity with the ways by which we and our theological forebears arrived at our own place in history, it is a benison of the first order.

See what so impressed Phyllis Tickle—get an Anglican base package today. Use coupon code ANGLICANBP to get 15% off!

Improve Your Study of Biblical Languages

Fortress Press New Testament BundleDoing research for your dissertation? Looking to further your investigation of the Christology of John and Paul, or of Hebrew poetics in the Minor Prophets?

Check out these three new bundles from Sheffield Academic Press, Augsburg Fortress Press, and the Pontifical Biblical Institute, which explore issues of language, interpretation, and ancient culture in the context of New and Old Testament study:

Fortress Press New Testament Studies Bundle (70 vols.)

This bundle is a treasure trove of key modern works on Matthew, Luke/Acts, John, the Pauline epistles, Jesus, and Paul. The collection’s contributors include E.P. Sanders, Ben Witherington III, Luke Timothy Johnson, and Terence L. Donaldson. Fortify your knowledge in NT studies: pick up this new bundle today!

Stanley E. Porter Language and Interpretation Collection (24 vols.)

Stanley E. Porter is famous for his expertise on New Testament textual and hermeneutic issues. This collection gives you his most renowned volumes, many of them cowritten with scholars like Craig A. Evans, D.A. Carson, David Tombs, and others. Not sure where to begin? We recommend Handbook to Exegesis of the New Testament, Idioms of the Greek New Testament, and New Testament Interpretation and Methods.

Pontifical Biblical Institute of Ancient Language StudiesPontifical Biblical Institute Ancient Language Studies (50 vols.)

Old Testament scholars, we haven’t forgotten about you! This impressive collection features both New and Old Testament studies in ancient languages, including Ugaritic, Akkadian, Hebrew, Aramaic, and Northwest Semitic. Dig into the Targums and other ancient Jewish writings with Joseph Fitzmyer, Martin McNamara, Daniel J. Harrington, and other trusted scholars—you’ll get a better understanding of the ancient world’s languages and cultures.

Save when you buy in bulk, and never pay twice!

With Logos.com’s Dynamic Pricing, you won’t be charged for volumes you already own—just sign in and view a bundle’s page to see your special custom price. What’s more, these collections’ massive bundling discounts give you more scholarship for your dollar. And you can make things even more affordable with an interest-free payment plan: just add a collection to your cart to see your options!

Learn from the Experts with the Lexham Methods Series

lexham-methods-series (2)A few weeks ago, we dropped the price of the Lexham Methods Series to $60: that’s over 75% off, an incredible discount on such a valuable resource. Have you placed your Community Pricing bid? If not, you should bid right now—a price this low won’t last long!

Need a bit more convincing? Our team of scholars has put hours of research and writing into the resource, but to make it even better, we’ve also called on a number of expert contributors. Lexham Methods is a collaboration between professors, linguists, and our in-house research team.

Here’s what our partners have to say about their work on the Methods series:

What’s most rewarding about working on the Lexham Methods Series?

David B. Schreiner (PhD): My favorite part of working with the series is rising to the challenge. Writing on a particular interpretive method forces you to know all aspects of the method. Writing for an audience that’s not necessarily restricted to the academy forces you to be on top of your game. You have to communicate ideas in a way that ensures broad-scale understanding.

Amy Balogh (PhD candidate, Iliff School of Theology & University of Denver): The best part about working on the Lexham Methods Series is the opportunity to share my understanding of the biblical text as a skillfully crafted work of art. Knowing that all who read from this series will come away with fresh, new insights into the text makes the project one that’s worthy of the time, effort, and care going into it.

How can the Lexham Methods Series help our users make their Bible study better?

John DelHousaye (PhD, associate professor, Phoenix Seminary): The Lexham Methods Series takes many of the best insights of biblical scholarship in the last two centuries and presents them in an understandable, practical way for the serious student of God’s Word.

Douglas Estes (PhD, lead pastor, Trinity Church & adjunct professor, Phoenix Seminary): With the Logos platform, Bible students of all levels can use this series as an easy-to-understand reference running parallel to the text. As a result, it has great potential to eliminate the divide between the professional scholar and the everyday Bible student.

What sets the Lexham Methods Series apart from similar products?

Judith Odor (PhD candidate, Asbury Theological Seminary): The brevity of the chapters—of each treatment of each method—makes the LMS unique in its field. There may be other introductions to various methods that offer the same depth of material, but they’re much lengthier, they’re more involved, they’re less approachable, and they don’t offer such a wide range of methods for your perusal, refreshment, or education.

Jeffery Leonard (PhD, assistant professor, Samford University): One of the best things about the Lexham Methods Series is the way it walks the reader step by step through each individual method, giving examples and comparisons along the way. It does a great job of balancing theory on the one hand with practical examples on the other.

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Understand and interpret the Bible better than ever before. Bid now on the Lexham Methods Series!

Dying to Bear Fruit: A Life of Sacrificial Love

04-16_John_12Could this be the Messiah? After so many years, had God finally sent his Anointed One to deliver his people? Would the rightful King now take his throne?

Indeed, the Messiah had come—Jesus was here! His disciples believed in him. They publicly confessed, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matt. 16:16). They knew that he had come for their deliverance.

Yet even his disciples did not really understand what Jesus had come to do. They expected the Messiah to be a warrior king. They wanted him to reinstate the kingdom of Israel, to start a revolution, to overthrow their oppressors by force, to deliver them from Rome. But Jesus had a different deliverance in mind.

Deliverance through his love

“The reason the Son of God appeared,” we read in 1 John 3:8, “was to destroy the works of the devil.” Jesus came to save his people not from Rome or from any other earthly oppression, but from their sins (Matt. 1:21). And his people include far more than Israel—Jesus came to deliver the whole world from sin.

His methods weren’t what the disciples expected, either. They expected Jesus to pick up a sword and fight, but he said that “all who take the sword will perish by the sword” (Matt. 26:52). He instructed his followers to “love your enemies . . . and you will be sons of the Most High” (Luke 6:35).

Jesus knew that evil cannot be overthrown by force. Deliverance can only come through sacrificial love. His own glorification could only be achieved by laying down his life.

And Jesus answered them, “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.” (John 12:23–24)

Jesus, God in flesh, willingly gave himself up. He took our sin and allowed the powers of darkness to do their worst to him. And in so doing, he broke their power.

When he was reviled, he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten, but continued entrusting himself to him who judges justly. He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. (1 Pet. 2:23–24)

Fruit for his kingdom

Through Jesus’ sacrificial death, we have deliverance. But we too must die if we are to bear fruit. We must die to our sins, and we must die to ourselves. Just as Jesus gave up his rights and died on the cross, we must give up the rights we think are ours. We must give up whatever it is we’re clinging to and live a life of sacrificial love.

But of course Jesus did not stay dead—God raised him back to life and vindicated his suffering. And so our sacrifice for Christ will not be in vain, either. From our death to self, God will raise up much fruit for his kingdom.

But are we willing to die?

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Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

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